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Top 5 Medium Height Indigenous plants for Atrium Gardens

These are the medium height plants that you would use in an atrium garden. These are the fillers that provide some colour.

Clivia miniata

(Bush Lily)

An evergreen groundcover which is water wise and grows in shade or semi-shade. The orange or yellow flowers occur in spring and are a favourite garden subject. The flowers attract birds and are long lasting in the vase. They do well in containers and are suitable for a shady corner in a townhouse garden. The roots are used medicinally for snake bite, fevers, childbirth, pregnancy and as a charm against evil. It is considered a good indicator of wealth, health and rains if one is growing near the homestead. They are an international collector’s item as they are hybridized to produce variegated leaves and a host of colours. The seed takes almost a year to ripen on the plant. A yellow Clivia seed is yellow when ripe, whereas the orange turn almost red. Clean the fleshy covering from the seed and this is said to strengthen ones fingernails. Rub the seeds with bleach to prevent disease and rot. Place the seed on the surface of a seed tray and cover with leaf litter. Don't over water as they they may rot otherwise they are easy to germinate. It was named for Lady Charlotte Florentina Clive in 1828. William Burchell first discovered them in the Eastern Cape in 1820. Miniata means the colour of red lead.

Plectranthus ecklonii

(Large Spurflower Bush)

Evergreen shrub which is drought resistant and fast growing. It thrives in the shade or semi-shade. There are white, mauve or pink flowering plants that produce masses of flowers in autumn. They attract birds, the insect eaters. This is the larval host plant for Bush Bronze, Mocker Blue, Eyed Pansy, the March Commodor and the African Leaf Commodor butterflies. It’s great for containers or mass planted at the back of a bed. It is used in traditional medicine. It is ideal for a townhouse garden. The name is derived from the Greek plektron = a spur; anthos= a flower. These plants have conspicuously spurred flowers.

Plectranthus fruticosus

(Forest Spurflower)

An evergreen shrub that grows about 1m x 1m and is very fast growing with large softly textured heart shaped leaves. It produces masses of attractive pyramidal spikes of pink or bluish-mauve flowers in summer. Cut back after flowering to encourage new growth. It is drought resistant and does well in deep or dappled shade. Rub the stems on a windowsill to repel flies. This is the larval host plant for Bush Bronze, Mocker Blue, Eyed Pansy, the March Commodor and the African Leaf Commodor butterflies. The name is derived from the Greek plektron = a spur; anthos= a flower. These plants have conspicuously spurred flowers.

Sansevieria trifasculata

(Mother-In-Laws-Tongue)

This is an evergreen shrub that grows to 1 m high. It should be planted in a semi-shaded area. It is an ideal plant for containers. You could mass plant them for a dramatic effect. It is used medicinally for many ailments and is used in rituals to remove the ‘evil eye’. It makes a successful house plant as it copes well in low light and only needs water every couple of weeks. Studies by NASA show that it successfully removes toxin of nitrogen oxide and formaldehyde so therefore improves air quality. The discoverer of the Sansevieria, Vincenzo Petanga wanted this plant named after Pietro Antonio Sansevierino (1724-1771) who established a garden of rare and exotic plants in the south of Italy but Carl Thunberg named it after Raimondo di Sangro (1710-1771) an Italian nobleman, inventor, soldier, writer and scientist.

Zantedeschia aethiopica

(White Arum Lily, Pig's Lily)

Commonly called 'Pig's Lily' as the tubers were boiled and fed to the pigs. Porcupines also enjoy the tubers. The leaves are also cooked as a pot herb, then braised with onions and chilli. A much loved evergreen groundcover which is fast growing in the shade or semi-shade. The large white flowers occur in spring and they attract birds and butterflies. There’s a multitude of uses for this much loved flower, either in wetlands, near water features or in containers. It has medicinal uses as the warmed leaves are used on sores, boils, insect bites, for gout, ulcers, headaches and rheumatism. The leaves must not be crushed as the juice is an irritant. Leaf, root and stem extracts show antibiotic properties.The leaves produce a yellow dye. The flowers are long lasting in a vase. Named for Giovanni Zantedeschia (1773-1846) an Italian physician, pharmacist and botanist. He was particularly interested in the flora of Northern Italy where he discovered and described many new species.

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