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Aloe zebrina

(No common name)

This Aloe spreads rapidly to form dense stands. It occurs in the full sun in the northern part of South Africa. The flowers are pink/dull red and occur in summer. It is a stem less aloe which has spotted leaves that tend to merge and form stripes. It does have medicinal uses as the dried , powdered leaves and stems are used as a cleansing drink after childbirth, and the roots are used as a yellow dye to colour baskets.

Ammocharis coranica

(Seeroogblom)

Although this bulb is deciduous it is worth planting as the fragrant pink flowers, which open in summer are so beautiful. The leaves are arranged in a whorl which is also attractive. It is frost resistant and drought resistant. An excellent choice for hot, dry spots and rockeries. It is used medicinally to treat serious afflictions caused by witchcraft. The name originates from the Greek 'ammo' = sand as it grows well in sandy soil.

Carpobrotus edulis

(Sour Fig)

This evergreen groundcover is fast growing and occurs on the sand dunes at the sea. This is fortunate as the leaves are used medicinally to treat Blue Bottle Stings and sunburn. It is water wise, frost resistant and is sun loving. The pink flowers open in summer and these attract insect eating birds. Fruits are eaten raw or processed into jam or used in oriental cooking. As early as 1815 it was made into jam and is still considered to be the finest of indigenous preserves. To make the jam take 500 g of very ripe fruit and peel them before leaving them on a cake rack overnight. Put them into a pot and boil until they are soft. Remove from the heat and drain. Make a syrup using 500 g sugar and 500 ml of water, 12 ml of lemon juice and salt along with the fruit. Boil till thick and the fruit are dark red colour. Bottle and enjoy. It is often planted to retain soil on steep banks as it roots as it creeps along the ground.There are numerous medicinal uses. It is used as an enema for children, those with allergies or diabetes. The leaf juice is astringent and antiseptic and is used as a gargle for sore throats as well as diphtheria, thrush, digestion, dysentery, bruises, scrapes, cuts, sunburn and ringworm. Fruit infusions are used during pregnancy to ease child birth. The leaf sap is put on a newborn's head to make the child nimble and strong. It was used as a remedy for TB mixing equal quantities of honey, sour fig leaf sap and olive oil. This was diluted in water and taken 3 times a day. The honey made from Carpobrotus pollen has a unique flavour. In 1700, plants were taken to the UK and Europe and they are now growing on the south coast of England and the Mediteranean. It is waterwise. The name comes from the Greek Karphos=fruit and brotos=edible.

Crassula arborescens

This is a medium sized shrub or small tree that glows silvery as a result of their bluish-grey foliage. It is an impressive looking single-stemmed, or many branched shrub or small tree, easily reaching a height of up to 3 m. The trunk is thick and fleshy and has a smooth, green-grey bark. The leaves show very little variation and are thick and fleshy, with a blue-grey colour, with a reddish rim, and the petiole is very short or absent. The star - like flowers are very showy and carried in dense branches above the leaves. They are white to pink in colour and open from Spring to Summer. After pollination, the flowers turn to a papery brown seed, which in itself is quite decorative. It attracts birds. This is the larval host plant for the Common Hairtail butterfly. Named from the Latin 'crassus'= and 'ula'= diminutive referring to the fleshy succulent leaves. It is used medicinally to treat epilepsy.

Crassula nana

This little Crassula is very low growing and is drought resistant and will withstand a light frost. It grows best in semi shade or shade and would be idea in a rockery or a hanging basket. The flowers open in summer. This is the larval host plant for the Tailed Black-eye butterfly. Named from the Latin 'crassus'= and 'ula'= diminutive referring to the fleshy succulent leaves. The word 'nana' means dwarf or small.

Delosperma cooperi

(Pink Carpet)

This is a dwarf perennial plant which forms a dense ‘lawn’ with abundant, long lasting, vygie-like flowers. The flowers are the most brilliant aspect of the plant, with a great quantity of vermillion, magenta or pink flowers that often cover the entire site. It thrives in full sun. They are water wise, drought resistant and undemanding. They will happily grow in poor soil. Mass plant for effect. They will also be good in pots as it trails over the edge. The name is derived from Greek 'delos'= visible referring to the seeds that are easily seen.

Delosperma rogersii

(Mountain Vygie)

This succulent plant has softly-hairy, lance shaped leaves which occur in clusters along the flexible stem. The typical vygie flower is small and butter yellow with a paler centre. It flowers from spring through summer. It is an ideal plant for the rockery because it creeps and draped itself around and over obstacles with ease. It is sensitive to frost and very drought tolerant and be warned that too much water will kill it. It must only be watered during dry season. It can be planted in a container or in a hanging basket. Perfect plant for townhouse gardens. The name is derived from Greek 'delos'= visible, referring to the seeds that are easily seen.

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