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Buddleja salvifolia

(Sagewood)

This small, deciduous tree is frost resistant, drought resistant and fast growing in the sun or semi-shade. The pink/mauve flowers open in the summer and they attract birds, bees and many butterfly species. It is useful for hedging/screening or containers. It is said to have aggressive roots, but I have not observed that. It is used to stabilize embankments around dams, streams and rivers. It is very useful as a nurse plant to protect other trees in very cold areas, so one would plant 2 trees in the same, large hole. Once the frost tender one has grown, the Buddleja salvifolia can be removed. It is magical and medicinal and the roots are poisonous and are used in withcraft but the flowers are used as a springtime tonic. This tree is an indicator of underground water or streams. It is useful on a game farm where it is browsed. It is used medicinally as the roots are used to treat coughs and colds and eye infections and colic are treated with a leaf infusion, with only 4 leaves in a cup of hot water. A root decoction is used for stomach aches and upsets, colic diarrhea and flatulence. Bark is steeped in hot water over night and is used to treat sores and scratches as well as an eye lotion. The fresh or dried leaves are used to make tea, to be enjoyed black with honey. Established trees are easily transplanted. Flowers can be dried for pot pourri. Named for Adam Buddle 1660-1715 an English amateur botanist, vicar and plant collector. He created Britain's first herbarium.

Crassula arborescens

This is a medium sized shrub or small tree that glows silvery as a result of their bluish-grey foliage. It is an impressive looking single-stemmed, or many branched shrub or small tree, easily reaching a height of up to 3 m. The trunk is thick and fleshy and has a smooth, green-grey bark. The leaves show very little variation and are thick and fleshy, with a blue-grey colour, with a reddish rim, and the petiole is very short or absent. The star - like flowers are very showy and carried in dense branches above the leaves. They are white to pink in colour and open from Spring to Summer. After pollination, the flowers turn to a papery brown seed, which in itself is quite decorative. It attracts birds. This is the larval host plant for the Common Hairtail butterfly. Named from the Latin 'crassus'= and 'ula'= diminutive referring to the fleshy succulent leaves. It is used medicinally to treat epilepsy.

Crassula nana

This little Crassula is very low growing and is drought resistant and will withstand a light frost. It grows best in semi shade or shade and would be idea in a rockery or a hanging basket. The flowers open in summer. This is the larval host plant for the Tailed Black-eye butterfly. Named from the Latin 'crassus'= and 'ula'= diminutive referring to the fleshy succulent leaves. The word 'nana' means dwarf or small.

Crassula swaziensis

Low growing succulent which is very pretty as the leaves are arranged in rosettes. It is low growing and produces pinky white flowers in autumn and winter. It would be great in dry places in a town house gardens or in pots. It would look lovely mass planted in a large garden. Drought resistant. This is the larval host plant for the Tailed Black-eye butterfly. Named from the Latin 'crassus'= and 'ula'= diminutive referring to the fleshy succulent leaves.

Dais cotinifolia

(Pompon Tree)

This small, fast growing, drought and frost resistant tree has a lovely rounded, leafy crown. It can be single- or multi-stemmed, with the brown stems covered in small speckles of whitish cork. In very cold areas they are deciduous, but in warmer climates they only lose their leaves for a short time at the end of winter. The trees flower in early summer and the new flower buds look like lollypops. This is a wonderful tree for the garden as the flowers last for a month and they are useful in flower arrangements. Place a thick layer of mulch or compost around the base of the tree as this helps to keep the soil moist and cool, suppresses weed growth and slowly releases nutrients into the soil. It attracts butterflies. The bark is stripped and used for whips, binding or plaited into rope. They do not have aggressive roots so can be planted 2 meters from a building or a pool and is suitable for townhouse gardens. It is fast growing, at about 1 meter a year. It prefers full sun and doesn't seem happy near the coast. An admirer who saw a tree in flower, took seed back to Holland where it was grown in 1757. It was named by one of the greatest botanists, Linnaeus.

Diascia integerrima

(Twinspur)

This evergreen ground cover grows to 30 cm and is fast growing in the sun or semi-shade. The pink and white flowers are seen all year. It’s great for a bird garden as it attracts insect eaters as well as attracts butterflies. It is great for containers as it’s a showy ground cover. Be sure that the containers don't dry out as this plant likes water, good soil and drainage. It’s a good idea to interplant with Watsonias. It is also useful as it is used as a pot herb. The name is derived from the Greek 'di'=two and 'askion'=bladder or belly referring to two lateral corolla pouches. Integerimma refers to the entire leaf margin which is not serrated.

Dimorphotheca jucundum (was Osteospermum jucundum)

(Trailing Mauve Daisy)

This evergreen groundcover grows to 20 x 60cm and is frost resistant and fast growing in the sun or semi-shade. The pink/purple flowers open in Autumn-Spring and attract insect eating birds and is the larval host plant for the Dickson's opal, Pan opal and the Turner's Opal butterflies. butterflies. It can be planted into containers or to creeping as it covers quickly. The name is derived from the Greek di = two, morphe=form, theka=a fruit referring to the two different shaped fruit . Striking in flower and also looks pretty cascading over rocks.

Dyschoriste sp nova

This evergreen shrub that grows to 30cm high and is frost resistant. Plant it in the sun or semi-shade. It produces pale pinky white flowers almost all year. An ideal plant for containers. Beautiful in flower and if mass planted. I've seen is used as a low hedge around a garden bed.It is the larval host plant for the Marbled Elf, Small Marbled Elf and the Gaika Blue butterflies. The name is derived from the Greek dys=poorly and khoristos= separated. The stigma is only weakly bilobed.

Dyschoriste thunbergiiflora

(Purple Bells)

Purple Bells is an evergreen shrub which is fast growing in the sun or semi-shade. It grows to about 1.7m tall and has a spread of 1.5 meters. The beautiful violet flowers occur in summer and whenever I see them I wish that I could paint them accurately. The flowers are trumpet shaped and have purple blotches in the throat. They attract butterflies and it is the larval host plant for the Marbled Elf, Small Marbled Elf and the Gaika Blue butterflies. It would be pretty in a container or planted next to a water feature or pond. They are drought tolerant. We have used it successfully as a screen, a very beautiful one when it is in flower. Keep cutting the top few leaves and this will force the plant to send out new branches. I've seen it hedged and it responds well to pruning. It looks lovely at the back of a mixed bed and is pretty planted in the shade along with the Pistol Bush Duvernoia adhatodoides and the Forest Bell Bush Mackaya bella which has now been renamed Asystasia bella. The name is derived from the Greek dys=poorly and khoristos= separated. The stigma is only weakly bilobed.

Felicia erigeroides

(Wild Michaelmas Daisy)

An evergreen, herbaceous perennial or sprawling shrub. It has a slender, erect growth habit 0.75–1 m high. The leaves (40 mm x 8 mm ) are usually 3-veined and borne in tufts. The edges of the leaves are fringed with hairs. It has pink daisy flowers with a yellow center. It flowers from late spring through summer and prefers full sun. It does grow well in a semi-shade but it doesn't flower as prolifically. It is drought and wind tolerant and doesn't mind being pruned. An ideal plant for containers. It also attract birds and butterflies. The name is derived from the Latin felix=happy which probably refers to the cheerful flowers.

Gerbera jamesonii

(Barbeton Daisy)

This is a perennial groundcover with deeply lobed leaves covered with silky hairs. The striking flower is borne on a long stalk and the outermost petals (ray florets) may be cream, red, orange, yellow or pink, while the central flowers (disc florets) are cream. Flowering occurs in spring and autumn. It requires full sun and moderate watering. It is an ideal plant for containers. It attract birds and is much loved throughout the world. It is long lasting in a vase. Named for Traugott Gerber ( 1710-1743)

Hesperantha coccinea (was Schizostylis coccinea)

(Scarlet River Lily)

This deciduous groundcover of 50cm x 20cm loves moist conditions and it looks stunning next to a water features or pond.The beautiful, attractive star shaped scarlet flowers of bright red, pink or white open in summer and attract buterflies. It is frost hardy and it also require lots of water as it likes to be in a wetland area. It is also good for containers. I once saw these in full flower in the marshy area on the bank of a river in Wakkerstroom, which proves how frost hardy they are.

Hibiscus penduncularis

(Pink Hibiscus)

Evergreen, water wise shrub that grows about 1m x 1m. It thrives in semi-shade and produces lovely pink, bell shaped flowers in Summer. It is an ideal plant for a container on a shady patio. It will grow in the sun but will then require more water. It also attracts birds and the Foxy Charaxes, Foxt Emperor and Star Sandman butterflies. Leaf and stalk infusions are used for urinary complaints. The name is derived from the Greek hibiskos the name for a 'marsh-mallow' and ibis= a stork that fed on some mallow species.

Hypoestes aristata

(Ribbon Bush)

An evergreen shrub which is frost resistant, water wise and fast growing. It will thrive in the sun, shade, or semi-shade. The white, pink or mauve flowers occur in autumn and attract birds, the insect eaters, as well as butterflies. It flowers profusely when nothing else is in flower and yet it is undemanding other than an annual pruning at the end of Winter. It is lovely for small gardens, especially if you get Hypoestes Little Pink. This fast-growing evergreen shrub grows to 1.5 m high. It produces soft, hairy leaves, and has attractive pink flowers borne in spike-like inflorescence. It requires very little attention. Ribbon bush is eaten as spinach in some areas, while traditionally the crushed leaves are used as a poultice for sore eyes. Roots are chewed for flu, coughs, colds, sore throats and breast diseases. The root bark is used to treat malaria. It also makes a good cut flower because it lasts well in water and it is an ideal plant for the containers. Bees, flies and other small insects visit the flowers in search of nectar or pollen, thus becoming a food source for insectivorous birds. This is one of the best nectar plants for the Swallowtail butterflies and it is the larval host to the Forest Beauty, Yellow, Brown and Blue Pansy butterflies and 1 moth specie. The name is derived from the Greek hypo= beneath and estia= house; referring to the way the bracts cover the calyx.

Indigofera jucunda ( frutescens and cylindrica)

(River Indigo)

This tree was originally called Indigofera frutescens. It is a small evergreen tree which is frost resistant and will thrive in the sun or semi-shade. The delicate pink flowers open in summer which makes a stunning sight. Eve Palmer describes them as "pretty things all lightness and grace". They are pollinated by bees. It is useful for containers and is a popular garden tree. It can be cut back to make a multi stemmed shrub or left as a single stemmed tree. It produces strong wood and is used magically as the roots are used as a love charm. They are also used medicinally as a worm remedy. It is the larval host to the Common Blue, Lucerne Blue, Grass Jewel Blue, Grizzled Blue. Karkloof Blue, Restless Blue,Clover Blue Striped Policeman and the African Clouded Yellow butterflies. The leaves are used to make dye. This is a popular bonsai subject. The name is derived from the Katin indicus, Greek indikos referrijng to India. The Latin ferax = bearing. Indigo is blue dye.

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