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Haemanthus humilis

(Rabbits Ears)

This deciduous groundcover has fairly round, flat leaves and it thrives very well when planted in a semi-shaded area. it often grows between rocks on hillsides in the full sun only getting a little shade from the grasses. The pink flowers open in Summer. It is an ideal plant for a water wise garden. The name is derived from the Greek haima=blood as the colour of the perianth , flower, is red in many cases.

Hesperantha coccinea (was Schizostylis coccinea)

(Scarlet River Lily)

This deciduous groundcover of 50cm x 20cm loves moist conditions and it looks stunning next to a water features or pond.The beautiful, attractive star shaped scarlet flowers of bright red, pink or white open in summer and attract buterflies. It is frost hardy and it also require lots of water as it likes to be in a wetland area. It is also good for containers. I once saw these in full flower in the marshy area on the bank of a river in Wakkerstroom, which proves how frost hardy they are.

Hibiscus penduncularis

(Pink Hibiscus)

Evergreen, water wise shrub that grows about 1m x 1m. It thrives in semi-shade and produces lovely pink, bell shaped flowers in Summer. It is an ideal plant for a container on a shady patio. It will grow in the sun but will then require more water. It also attracts birds and the Foxy Charaxes, Foxt Emperor and Star Sandman butterflies. Leaf and stalk infusions are used for urinary complaints. The name is derived from the Greek hibiskos the name for a 'marsh-mallow' and ibis= a stork that fed on some mallow species.

Hypoestes aristata

(Ribbon Bush)

An evergreen shrub which is frost resistant, water wise and fast growing. It will thrive in the sun, shade, or semi-shade. The white, pink or mauve flowers occur in autumn and attract birds, the insect eaters, as well as butterflies. It flowers profusely when nothing else is in flower and yet it is undemanding other than an annual pruning at the end of Winter. It is lovely for small gardens, especially if you get Hypoestes Little Pink. This fast-growing evergreen shrub grows to 1.5 m high. It produces soft, hairy leaves, and has attractive pink flowers borne in spike-like inflorescence. It requires very little attention. Ribbon bush is eaten as spinach in some areas, while traditionally the crushed leaves are used as a poultice for sore eyes. Roots are chewed for flu, coughs, colds, sore throats and breast diseases. The root bark is used to treat malaria. It also makes a good cut flower because it lasts well in water and it is an ideal plant for the containers. Bees, flies and other small insects visit the flowers in search of nectar or pollen, thus becoming a food source for insectivorous birds. This is one of the best nectar plants for the Swallowtail butterflies and it is the larval host to the Forest Beauty, Yellow, Brown and Blue Pansy butterflies and 1 moth specie. The name is derived from the Greek hypo= beneath and estia= house; referring to the way the bracts cover the calyx.

Impatiens sylvicola

(Salmon Impatiens)

A low scrambling annual or short-lived perennial which roots at the lower nodes. The leaves are spirally arranged, more or less broadly ovate-lanceolate, 2-10 cm long, and the margin is scalloped or toothed. Flowers are solitary or in few-flowered clusters, pink or mauve with a deep mauve to red spot near the base of the upper lateral petals. The flowers open in summer. It is a lovely groundcover for a wet land areas in the garden or plant it near pond in dappled shade. Frost tender. The name is derived from the Latin impatiens = referring to the bursting of the seed pod and forceful scattering of the seeds.

Indigofera jucunda ( frutescens and cylindrica)

(River Indigo)

This tree was originally called Indigofera frutescens. It is a small evergreen tree which is frost resistant and will thrive in the sun or semi-shade. The delicate pink flowers open in summer which makes a stunning sight. Eve Palmer describes them as "pretty things all lightness and grace". They are pollinated by bees. It is useful for containers and is a popular garden tree. It can be cut back to make a multi stemmed shrub or left as a single stemmed tree. It produces strong wood and is used magically as the roots are used as a love charm. They are also used medicinally as a worm remedy. It is the larval host to the Common Blue, Lucerne Blue, Grass Jewel Blue, Grizzled Blue. Karkloof Blue, Restless Blue,Clover Blue Striped Policeman and the African Clouded Yellow butterflies. The leaves are used to make dye. This is a popular bonsai subject. The name is derived from the Katin indicus, Greek indikos referrijng to India. The Latin ferax = bearing. Indigo is blue dye.

Jasminum multipartitum

(Starry Wild Jasmine)

This evergreen scrambler is water wise and is happy planted in the sun or semi shade. The fragrant white/pink flowers occur in spring and attract butterflies. This plant attracts birds - insect and nectar eaters and is also used for nesting sites. Plant it against a trellis on the patio where you will enjoy the fragrant flowers. It is ideal for small gardens to create a screen and is happy to be in a pot, but do provide lots of compost. It is used magically as a love charm. It is a larval host to the Cambridge Blue butterfly and 6 species of moths. The Hawk moths pollinate the flowers. Margaret Roberts suggests planting it up a twirley dryer to create a shady, sweetly scented spot to sit. She also suggests that the dried flowers make an excellent digestive tea. The flowers are also used in a bath vinegar. They are pushed into a bottle of vinegar and left in the sun for a week. It is then strained and 1 cup is added to bath water or used as a hair rinse. They also make a lovely pot-pourri. The name is derived from the Persian yasmin = a fragrant shrub.

Lampranthus sp

(Vygies)

A valuable addition to any garden as their iridescent flowers are seen in spring and summer. Their striking colours are a highlight after the drab winter garden when only the Aloes are in flower. They are all drought resistant and creep along the ground creating a carpet of striking colour. They attract butterflies and are useful in rockeries, along a path or in a hanging basket. They are frost resistant and fast growing. The leaves vary from dull ,dusty green to a bright, light green. The name is derived from the Greek lampros = bright, shining; anthos = flower; referring to the light reflecting off the glossy petals.

Melinus repens

(Natal Red Top)

A perennial tufted grass with attractive, hairy inflorescences. Spikelets are covered with long velvety, red, pink to white hairs. It flowers from September to June. It grows in sunny, dry places, in all type of soil but prefers a well-drained soil. It is very pretty when in flower. The birds use the seed heads as nesting material. Named from the Greek meline - name for grain (millet) Melinis is Greek for quince-yellow. The word 'repens' means creeping which refers to it's growth habit.

Myrsine africana

(Cape Myrtle)

This slow-growing, evergreen small shrub with a rather stiff and upright shape when old, can reach 1 to 2 m high over time. The cream-coloured flowers formed in groups at the base of the leaves in spring and the male and female flowers are borne on separate plants. The male flowers with their red anthers are more conspicuous than the female flowers. It is, however, the female plants that are covered with the attractive purple-coloured fruits after flowering. The fleshy, round fruits each with one seed, are formed in abundance tight against the stem and remain on the plants for many months. It grows well in dry, semi-shade under trees as well as in the full sun between plants and in a rockery. Birds love the fleshy fruits and it is the larval host plant for the Brauer's Opal and the Mooi River Opal butterflies. The leaves are used medicinally as a blood purifier. Tghe name originates from the Greek for the common Myrtle which it resembles.

Nerine filifolia

(Grass-Leaved Nerine)

This fast-growing, evergreen bulb grows about 25cm x 15cm and it multiplies rapidly. It grows well in a wide variety of soils but does very well in a wet land area. Plant them where they will be exposed to full sun for most of the day. This will encourage the production of strong, straight, upright flowering stalks. They can be mass planted as a border to a flower bed or along a garden path. They are also suitable for growing in containers in a sunny position, but ensure good drainage. They will survive with little water, but for a brilliant pink colour display in the middle of summer, it is better to water them regularly. This floriferous summer-growing plant produces delicate, bright pink flowers which bring a magnificent colourful display at the end of summer when not much else is flowering. If watered during the winter months, they will retain their leaves; otherwise the leaves will die off but will re-sprout the following spring. It can be cultivated for cut-flowers, as the flowers have a long-lasting vase life and are well worth using in flower arrangements. It is a very lovely bulb to have in the garden and it attracts butterflies. Filifolia refers to the thin, fine leaves.

Orthosiphon labiatus now Ocimum labiatus

(Pink Sage)

The name has changed to Osimum labiatus. This evergreen shrub is frost resistant, water wise and fast growing in sun, shade or semi-shade. It is a very popular garden plant as it is hardy to a moderate degree of frost and extreme drought, once established. It is prized for its showy display of pink - mauve flowers which open in summer and it makes a stunning show. They attract insect eating birds and butterflies. The aromatic leaves smell of mint when crushed. It is suitable for containers and is ideal for small gardens. If you have a large garden do mass planting for a stunning effect.

Pentas lanceolata

(Egyptian Starcluster)

Pentas lanceolata is an excellent small shrub for a colourful garden. It grows to around 1m in height, with summer and autumn flowers like neat round bouquets of tiny stars, in colours of red, white, lavender, purple, cerise and various shades of pink. It is one of the best butterflies attracting plants. It blooms all summer long, even during the hottest weather. It seems happiest in semi shade. Lanceolata refers to the lance shaped leaves.

Plectranthus fruticosus

(Forest Spurflower)

An evergreen shrub that grows about 1m x 1m and is very fast growing with large softly textured heart shaped leaves. It produces masses of attractive pyramidal spikes of pink or bluish-mauve flowers in summer. Cut back after flowering to encourage new growth. It is drought resistant and does well in deep or dappled shade. Rub the stems on a windowsill to repel flies. This is the larval host plant for Bush Bronze, Mocker Blue, Eyed Pansy, the March Commodor and the African Leaf Commodor butterflies. The name is derived from the Greek plektron = a spur; anthos= a flower. These plants have conspicuously spurred flowers.

Plectranthus fruticosus-james

(Pink Fly Bush)

This is a particularly attractive form of Plectranthus fruticosus, a shade-loving species with flowers mostly in shades of mauve but also in blue and pink. Plectranthus fruticosus 'James' has smaller, more succulent leaves and pink flowers. It is a robust, fast-growing, upright, drought resistant shrub that will reach a height of up to 2m. The leaves are very decorative, rich green in colour, softly hairy to the touch with margins that are attractively toothed and crinkled. Each little flower is pale pink speckled with purple. To add to the colour, the stem of the inflorescence is also stained purple. Flowering season begins in late summer and peaks in autumn. It is an ideal plant for containers and should cut back after flowering. It attracts birds.This is the larval host plant for Bush Bronze, Mocker Blue, Eyed Pansy, the March Commodor and the African Leaf Commodor butterflies. The name is derived from the Greek plektron = a spur; anthos= a flower. These plants have conspicuously spurred flowers.

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