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Agapanthus nana

(Miniature Blue||White Agapanthus)

An evergreen groundcover that grows to 25cm high and 35cm wide with grass-like leaves and sky blue or white flowers. It flowers in profusion in summer. It is frost resistant, drought resistant and fast growing. It thrives in the sun, shade and semi-shade. It is also an ideal plant for container. It attracts birds and butterflies. If it is mass planted it is impressive sight. It is also suitable for townhouse gardens. Use them in mixed borders, within flowerbeds or along pathways. The word 'nana' means dwarf or small.

Agapanthus praecox

(Common Agapanthus)

A well-loved, well used, dependable groundcover which is endemic to the Eastern Cape and Kwazulu Natal in South Africa. It is frost hardy, drought resistant and looks spectacular when mass planted. It was first described in 1679 in Europe and first planted there in 1692 where it is now a popular hothouse plant. There the common name is "African Hyacinth". Linnaeus called it an "African Lily". The name is derived from the Greek Agape so this is the love flower. Praecox means 'early' which refers to it's early flowering. Pregnant women wear pieces of the root made into necklace to ensure a healthy baby and ensure fertility. They also take a decoction of the root to ensure an easy birth and the newborn is washed in the same brew . The medicinal uses are as a result of the anti-inflammatory properties of the leaves that are used are bandages. The Zulu use it to treat heart diseases, paralysis and flu. They also wrap the leaves around their tired feet. It is also magical as it is used as a sprinkling charm against lightening. It’s a most useful plant which is undemanding and will grow in sun or shade and is water wise. It is also useful to stabilize a bank. The flowers are long lasting in a vase and they dry well for pot-pourri as they retain their colour. Large clumps can be divided after flowering. When replanted the leaves should be cut back.

Felicia amelloides

(Blue Felicia)

A lovely shade of blue. There are very few blue indigenous flowers compared to the other colours. There is also a white form. They are fast growing, frost and drought hardy and will do well in full sun or semi shade. They attract the insect and nectar feeding birds as well as butterflies. It’s a great ground cover for a small garden, in pots or hanging baskets. Mass planted it’s stunning. The name is derived from the Latin felix=happy which probably refers to the cheerful flowers.

Plectranthus neochilus

(Lobster Flower)

An evergreen perennial, aromatic, succulent herb, which grows to 500 mm high and 600 mm wide. The deep blue and purple flowers are borne from September to April. This Plectranthus has succulent, grey-green leaves, which form an attractive ground cover even when the plant is not in flower. They are used to scare away snakes from human dwellings (perhaps because of their unpleasant aromatic smell) and other documented reports indicate that these plants can be used effectively as an air purifier. Plants perform exceptionally well as ground covers in light shade and full sun. Stems root easily and the plant spreads, forming a tidy clump. The plant is often used in the landscaping of difficult sites. It may look a little stressed in very dry conditions, but bounces back when it receives some water. It is drought resistant. The plant prefers loam to sandy soil with good drainage and has relatively low water requirements. It is an ideal plant for containers and rockeries. This is the larval host plant for Bush Bronze, Garden Inspector, Mocker Blue, Eyed Pansy, the March Commodor and the African Leaf Commodor butterflies. The name is derived from the Greek plektron = a spur; anthos= a flower. These plants have conspicuously spurred flowers. Neochilus means new lipped which refers to the shape of the flower.

Plectranthus saccatus

(Stoep Jacaranda)

This evergreen groundcover is drought resistant and fast growing in the semi-shade. It occurs in the Eastern Cape and Kwazulu Natal. The blue or white flowers open in mid-summer. It attracts insect eating birds. Mass plant for a stunning effect. It can be planted indoors if it will receive afternoon sunlight, or in containers on a patio. It is deal for small gardens. This is the larval host plant for Bush Bronze, Mocker Blue, Eyed Pansy, the March Commodor and the African Leaf Commodor butterflies. The name is derived from the Greek plektron = a spur; anthos= a flower. These plants have conspicuously spurred flowers.

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