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Aloe speciosa

(Tilt-Head or Spanish Aloe)

This is an evergreen shrub that grows from 3 to 6m in height and can take full sun. It is drought resistant, grows well in most areas, even where moderate frost occurs and is ideal for water-wise gardens .It also appears to be the most unaffected by aloe snout beetles due to its peculiar leaf sap chemistry.Its makes lovely pink flowers which are rich in nectar, attracting sunbirds, bees, butterflies and ants .The leaves also produce pink dye . The word Aloe comes from the Greek and refers to the bitter leaf gel. Speciosa refers to the 'handsome, showy, splendid flowers.

Anisodontea classic cerise

(Pink Mallow)

This shrub flowered splendidly during one of our black frosts. It did not flinch, so I consider it top of my list of hardy plants. It is evergreen, very fast growing and fills a big space of at least 1m x 1m x 1m. Such an economical plant! It flowers all year and copes well in a drought. Plant it in the sun or semi shade and watch as it attracts butterflies and birds. The name originates from the Latin 'aniso'=unequal and 'odontos'=toothed which refers to the irregularly toothed leaves.

Cotyledon orbiculata

(Pigs Ears)

Pig’s Ear. Named from the Greek 'kotyledon'=seed sheath and 'kotyl'= cup referring to the bowl or spoon shaped seed leaves. This fast growing succulent has thick leaves that are greyish green. The tall flower spikes produce bunches of pink tubular flowers in winter. These attract bees and nectar feeding birds like the sunbirds. The leaves are used medicinally for corns, boils and warts and the leaf juice is used to treat earache, toothache and epilepsy. Syphilis is treated with an enema made from the leaves. They are also dried and used as a protective charm for an orphan child. Carl Pappe, a physician came to the Cape in 1831 and he studied the medicinal benefits for epilepsy. He wrote Indigenous Plants Used as remedies by the Colonists of The Cape of Good Hope in 1847. These plants have escaped from gardens in Australia, New Zealand and California and become an invasive weed, probably because they require very little water. It is the larval host for two moth species as well as Pale Hairtail, Burnished Opal, Natal Opal, Common Black-eye, Henning's Black-eye and the Cape Black-eye.

Crassula ovata

(Pink Joy, Money Plant, Penny Plant, Dollar Plant, Tree of Happiness)

This is a sturdy, branched, compact, rounded, evergreen succulent tree is thought of as a shrub growing from 1 - 3 m tall. It has glossy, dark to grey-green oval leaves on short, stubby branches and a robust stem or trunk. The leaves are often edged with red, more so if the plant is in full sun. The flowers are pink and the flowering time varies according to the climate. It is drought resistant. The stems soon become gnarled and stout, suggesting great age. It is grown all over the world, most often as a pot plant. The Khoi eat the roots. It attracts bees, wasps, flies and beetles. This is the larval host plant for the Tailed Black-eye butterfly. Slice a leaf in half and strap it to a wart and leave on overnight.It is magical and in the USA, Germany and the East it is planted into square, porcelain tubs to bring financial luck which gives rise to it's many common names. Named from the Latin 'crassus'= and 'ula'= diminutive referring to the fleshy succulent leaves.

Felicia erigeroides

(Wild Michaelmas Daisy)

An evergreen, herbaceous perennial or sprawling shrub. It has a slender, erect growth habit 0.75–1 m high. The leaves (40 mm x 8 mm ) are usually 3-veined and borne in tufts. The edges of the leaves are fringed with hairs. It has pink daisy flowers with a yellow center. It flowers from late spring through summer and prefers full sun. It does grow well in a semi-shade but it doesn't flower as prolifically. It is drought and wind tolerant and doesn't mind being pruned. An ideal plant for containers. It also attract birds and butterflies. The name is derived from the Latin felix=happy which probably refers to the cheerful flowers.

Grewia robusta

(Karoo Cross-Berry)

This is a deciduous, multi-stemmed shrub or small tree up to 3 m high. The flowers are small, bright pink and sweetly scented. They are solitary, up to 25 mm in diameter with stamens in a central mass.The flowering time is August–December. The fruits are round and reddish brown. It grows best in moist clay or light sand, in semi-shade and open areas. Best results are achieved by feeding the plant with organic fertilizer before flowering. It is frost and drought tolerant. It produces masses of sweetly scented and attractive pink flowers in summer. This Grewia is an excellent focal garden plant. It attract mammals and is suitable for a game farm. Named after Nehemiah Grew (1641-1712) a British physian, physiologist and botanist known as 'the father of plant physiology'. He graduate from Cambridge university in 1661 and then studied medicine at Leyden University in 1671. He published many works including The anatomy of Plants in 1682 and was a Fellow of the Royal Society.

Hibiscus penduncularis

(Pink Hibiscus)

Evergreen, water wise shrub that grows about 1m x 1m. It thrives in semi-shade and produces lovely pink, bell shaped flowers in Summer. It is an ideal plant for a container on a shady patio. It will grow in the sun but will then require more water. It also attracts birds and the Foxy Charaxes, Foxt Emperor and Star Sandman butterflies. Leaf and stalk infusions are used for urinary complaints. The mystical idea is that it's a love potion so dried petals are put into love incense and it is used in wedding ceremonies.The name is derived from the Greek hibiskos the name for a 'marsh-mallow' and ibis= a stork that fed on some mallow species.

Hypoestes aristata

(Ribbon Bush)

An evergreen shrub which is frost resistant, water wise and fast growing. It will thrive in the sun, shade, or semi-shade. The white, pink or mauve flowers occur in autumn and attract birds, the insect eaters, as well as butterflies. It flowers profusely when nothing else is in flower and yet it is undemanding other than an annual pruning at the end of Winter. It is lovely for small gardens, especially if you get Hypoestes Little Pink. This fast-growing evergreen shrub grows to 1.5 m high. It produces soft, hairy leaves, and has attractive pink flowers borne in spike-like inflorescence. It requires very little attention. Ribbon bush is eaten as spinach in some areas, while traditionally the crushed leaves are used as a poultice for sore eyes. Roots are chewed for flu, coughs, colds, sore throats and breast diseases. The root bark is used to treat malaria. It also makes a good cut flower because it lasts well in water and it is an ideal plant for the containers. Bees, flies and other small insects visit the flowers in search of nectar or pollen, thus becoming a food source for insectivorous birds. This is one of the best nectar plants for the Swallowtail butterflies and it is the larval host to the Forest Beauty, Yellow, Brown and Blue Pansy butterflies and 1 moth specie. The name is derived from the Greek hypo= beneath and estia= house; referring to the way the bracts cover the calyx.

Jasminum multipartitum

(Starry Wild Jasmine)

This evergreen scrambler is water wise and is happy planted in the sun or semi shade. The fragrant white/pink flowers occur in spring and attract butterflies. This plant attracts birds - insect and nectar eaters and is also used for nesting sites. Plant it against a trellis on the patio where you will enjoy the fragrant flowers. It is ideal for small gardens to create a screen and is happy to be in a pot, but do provide lots of compost. It is used magically as a love charm. Mystically the dried flowers are used in love sachets, to attract wealth and encourage prophetic dreams. Fresh flowers are smelled to induce sleep. It is a larval host to the Cambridge Blue butterfly and 6 species of moths. The Hawk moths pollinate the flowers. Margaret Roberts suggested planting it up a twirley dryer to create a shady, sweetly scented spot to sit. She also suggested that the dried flowers make an excellent digestive tea. The flowers are also used in a vinegar bath. They are pushed into a bottle of vinegar and left in the sun for a week. It is then strained and 1 cup is added to bath water or used as a hair rinse. They also make a lovely pot-pourri. The name is derived from the Persian yasmin = a fragrant shrub.

Orthosiphon labiatus now Ocimum labiatus

(Pink Sage)

The name has changed to Osimum labiatus. This evergreen shrub is frost resistant, water wise and fast growing in sun, shade or semi-shade. It is a very popular garden plant as it is hardy to a moderate degree of frost and extreme drought, once established. It is prized for its showy display of pink - mauve flowers which open in summer and it makes a stunning show. They attract insect eating birds and butterflies. The aromatic leaves smell of mint when crushed. It is suitable for containers and is ideal for small gardens. If you have a large garden do mass planting for a stunning effect.

Plectranthus fruticosus

(Forest Spurflower)

An evergreen shrub that grows about 1m x 1m and is very fast growing with large softly textured heart shaped leaves. It produces masses of attractive pyramidal spikes of pink or bluish-mauve flowers in summer. Cut back after flowering to encourage new growth. It is drought resistant and does well in deep or dappled shade. Rub the stems on a windowsill to repel flies. This is the larval host plant for Bush Bronze, Mocker Blue, Eyed Pansy, the March Commodor and the African Leaf Commodor butterflies. The name is derived from the Greek plektron = a spur; anthos= a flower. These plants have conspicuously spurred flowers.

Plectranthus fruticosus-james

(Pink Fly Bush)

This is a particularly attractive form of Plectranthus fruticosus, a shade-loving species with flowers mostly in shades of mauve but also in blue and pink. Plectranthus fruticosus 'James' has smaller, more succulent leaves and pink flowers. It is a robust, fast-growing, upright, drought resistant shrub that will reach a height of up to 2m. The leaves are very decorative, rich green in colour, softly hairy to the touch with margins that are attractively toothed and crinkled. Each little flower is pale pink speckled with purple. To add to the colour, the stem of the inflorescence is also stained purple. Flowering season begins in late summer and peaks in autumn. It is an ideal plant for containers and should cut back after flowering. It attracts birds.This is the larval host plant for Bush Bronze, Mocker Blue, Eyed Pansy, the March Commodor and the African Leaf Commodor butterflies. The name is derived from the Greek plektron = a spur; anthos= a flower. These plants have conspicuously spurred flowers.

Polygala fruticosa

(Heart-Leaved Polygala)

This is a neat, evergreen rounded shrub up to 1 m tall. The young leaves of this indigenous evergreen are tinged with purple, the shade echoed by the deep purple, winged flowers. Peak displays of flowers occur from spring to early summer, giving an unequalled show. It also produces a scattering of blooms throughout the year. Bees are particularly attracted to the nectar that the flowers produce and are the main pollinators. Seeds are enclosed in papery, flattened capsules that remain on the bush for quite some time during and after flowering. This hardy plant requires no special care. Good, enriched soil, full sun or semi-shade and plenty of water, will ensure rapid, healthy growth. It has excellent waterwise properties, and once established it will tolerate fairly heavy drought. Perfect as it is waterwise garden. It attracts birds and butterflies. The name is derived from the Greek poly=much and gala = milk as it is believed that cows that eat this plant produce more milk. Fruticosa means shrubby.

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