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Delosperma cooperi

(Pink Carpet)

This is a dwarf perennial plant which forms a dense ‘lawn’ with abundant, long lasting, vygie-like flowers. The flowers are the most brilliant aspect of the plant, with a great quantity of vermillion, magenta or pink flowers that often cover the entire site. It thrives in full sun. They are water wise, drought resistant and undemanding. They will happily grow in poor soil. Mass plant for effect. They will also be good in pots as it trails over the edge. The name is derived from Greek 'delos'= visible referring to the seeds that are easily seen.

Delosperma rogersii

(Mountain Vygie)

This succulent plant has softly-hairy, lance shaped leaves which occur in clusters along the flexible stem. The typical vygie flower is small and butter yellow with a paler centre. It flowers from spring through summer. It is an ideal plant for the rockery because it creeps and draped itself around and over obstacles with ease. It is sensitive to frost and very drought tolerant and be warned that too much water will kill it. It must only be watered during dry season. It can be planted in a container or in a hanging basket. Perfect plant for townhouse gardens. The name is derived from Greek 'delos'= visible, referring to the seeds that are easily seen.

Diascia integerrima

(Twinspur)

This evergreen ground cover grows to 30 cm and is fast growing in the sun or semi-shade. The pink and white flowers are seen all year. It’s great for a bird garden as it attracts insect eaters as well as attracts butterflies. It is great for containers as it’s a showy ground cover. Be sure that the containers don't dry out as this plant likes water, good soil and drainage. It’s a good idea to interplant with Watsonias. It is also useful as it is used as a pot herb. The name is derived from the Greek 'di'=two and 'askion'=bladder or belly referring to two lateral corolla pouches. Integerimma refers to the entire leaf margin which is not serrated.

Dierama medium

(Medium Harebell)

This deciduous bulb grows to 50cm x 50cm in the sun. It is frost resistant. The sprays of pink flowers occur in summer and it is a show stopper when in full bloom. As it occurs in wetlands and along our rivers so it is suitable for a bog garden or near a water feature. Burning in winter promotes flowering. If you have clay soil then dig in lots of organic compost as they are heavy feeders. The name is derived from the Greek 'diorama'=a funnel which refers to the shape of the flower.

Dierama pendulum

(Harebell or Angel's Fishing Rod)

This deciduous bulb grows to 1m x 1m in the sun. It is frost resistant. The sprays of pink flowers occur in summer and it is a show stopper when in full bloom. As it occurs in wetlands and along our rivers it is suitable for a bog garden or near a water feature. Burning in winter promotes flowering. The corms are placed in gourds as a charm for a good harvest. They are also crushed and used on bruises. The flowers are are mixed with hot water and the juice of the Sour Fig (Carpobrotus) leaf and applied to bites, stings and rashes. The bulbs are also medicinal as they are used as a purgative or an enema. The name is derived from the Greek 'diorama'=a funnel which refers to the shape of the flower.

Dimorphotheca jucundum (was Osteospermum jucundum)

(Trailing Mauve Daisy)

This evergreen groundcover grows to 20 x 60cm and is frost resistant and fast growing in the sun or semi-shade. The pink/purple flowers open in Autumn-Spring and attract insect eating birds and is the larval host plant for the Dickson's opal, Pan opal and the Turner's Opal butterflies. butterflies. It can be planted into containers or to creeping as it covers quickly. The name is derived from the Greek di = two, morphe=form, theka=a fruit referring to the two different shaped fruit . Striking in flower and also looks pretty cascading over rocks.

Gerbera jamesonii

(Barbeton Daisy)

This is a perennial groundcover with deeply lobed leaves covered with silky hairs. The striking flower is borne on a long stalk and the outermost petals (ray florets) may be cream, red, orange, yellow or pink, while the central flowers (disc florets) are cream. Flowering occurs in spring and autumn. It requires full sun and moderate watering. It is an ideal plant for containers. It attract birds and is much loved throughout the world. It is long lasting in a vase. Named for Traugott Gerber ( 1710-1743)

Haemanthus humilis

(Rabbits Ears)

This deciduous groundcover has fairly round, flat leaves and it thrives very well when planted in a semi-shaded area. it often grows between rocks on hillsides in the full sun only getting a little shade from the grasses. The pink flowers open in Summer. It is an ideal plant for a water wise garden. The name is derived from the Greek haima=blood as the colour of the perianth , flower, is red in many cases.

Hesperantha coccinea (was Schizostylis coccinea)

(Scarlet River Lily)

This deciduous groundcover of 50cm x 20cm loves moist conditions and it looks stunning next to a water features or pond.The beautiful, attractive star shaped scarlet flowers of bright red, pink or white open in summer and attract buterflies. It is frost hardy and it also require lots of water as it likes to be in a wetland area. It is also good for containers. I once saw these in full flower in the marshy area on the bank of a river in Wakkerstroom, which proves how frost hardy they are.

Lampranthus sp

(Vygies)

A valuable addition to any garden as their iridescent flowers are seen in spring and summer. Their striking colours are a highlight after the drab winter garden when only the Aloes are in flower. They are all drought resistant and creep along the ground creating a carpet of striking colour. They attract butterflies and are useful in rockeries, along a path or in a hanging basket. They are frost resistant and fast growing. The leaves vary from dull ,dusty green to a bright, light green. The name is derived from the Greek lampros = bright, shining; anthos = flower; referring to the light reflecting off the glossy petals.

Melinus repens

(Natal Red Top)

A perennial tufted grass with attractive, hairy inflorescences. Spikelets are covered with long velvety, red, pink to white hairs. It flowers from September to June. It grows in sunny, dry places, in all type of soil but prefers a well-drained soil. It is very pretty when in flower. The birds use the seed heads as nesting material. Named from the Greek meline - name for grain (millet) Melinis is Greek for quince-yellow. The word 'repens' means creeping which refers to it's growth habit.

Nerine filifolia

(Grass-Leaved Nerine)

This fast-growing, evergreen bulb grows about 25cm x 15cm and it multiplies rapidly. It grows well in a wide variety of soils but does very well in a wet land area. Plant them where they will be exposed to full sun for most of the day. This will encourage the production of strong, straight, upright flowering stalks. They can be mass planted as a border to a flower bed or along a garden path. They are also suitable for growing in containers in a sunny position, but ensure good drainage. They will survive with little water, but for a brilliant pink colour display in the middle of summer, it is better to water them regularly. This floriferous summer-growing plant produces delicate, bright pink flowers which bring a magnificent colourful display at the end of summer when not much else is flowering. If watered during the winter months, they will retain their leaves; otherwise the leaves will die off but will re-sprout the following spring. It can be cultivated for cut-flowers, as the flowers have a long-lasting vase life and are well worth using in flower arrangements. It is a very lovely bulb to have in the garden and it attracts butterflies. Filifolia refers to the thin, fine leaves.

Portulacaria afra prostrata

(Elephants Foot)

Dwarf Elephants Foot is another very versatile plant that grows in full sun to deep shade. It produces lavender coloured flowers in summer. It is water wise and has arching, trailing branches with reddish brown stems. It would be ideal in a pot, to scamper over the edge, a hanging basket or even retaining walls. I saw it flourishing in the baking hot sun in the Kruger Park, in a retailing wall at one of the rest camps in very harsh conditions.

Scadoxus multiflorus subsp. katharinae

(Katherine Wheel)

This is one of our most beautiful bulbs. The word ‘mutiflorus’ refers to the large flower which is 25 cm in diameter and is made up of numerous smaller flowers to form a ball. They are pinklish, orangy red and last for about 2 weeks. The seed is red when ripe so just as attractive. It likes moist shade and occurs from the Eastern Cape all the way up into Central Africa. I shall never forget the first time I saw it in flower at Ngorogoro Crater in Tanzania. It literally stops you in your tracks. Although it is poisonous it is also used medicinally and to make love charms. Named from the Greek scias= that which you know and the Greek doxus = glorious splendid referring to the magnificent, bright orange red flowers. A glorious umbrel.

Veltheimia bracteata

(Bush Lily)

These beautiful flowers look a bit like an Aloe. They stand about 50cm tall and are a striking pink-red or yellow in colour. They are deciduous during mid-summer. These are shade loving bulbs growing naturally in the coastal forests of the Eastern Cape. They are happy growing in a pot on a patio. Named for August Ferdinand von Veltheim ( 1741-1801] a German mineralogist, with interests in geology, Archaeology and civic matters. He was an inspector of mines and wrote a geology. He developed a beautiful botanical garden at the Castel in Harbke and was a patron of botany. He received an honoral PhD and was appointed a count by the king of Prussia.

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