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Agapanthus inapertus

(Drooping Agapanthus)

This is a deciduous groundcover, (1m -1.2m), which is frost resistant, drought resistant and fast growing in the sun, shade or semi-shade. The blue or purple flowers open in summer and they attract birds and butterflies. It occurs naturally in very cold grasslands and makes a good garden subject. One must just interplant it with evergreen groundcovers so that there is not a gap in your garden bed during the winter. The name is derived from the Greek Agape so this is the love flower. Inapertus means 'not open' and refers to the flowers.

Delosperma cooperi

(Pink Carpet)

This is a dwarf perennial plant which forms a dense ‘lawn’ with abundant, long lasting, vygie-like flowers. The flowers are the most brilliant aspect of the plant, with a great quantity of vermillion, magenta or pink flowers that often cover the entire site. It thrives in full sun. They are water wise, drought resistant and undemanding. They will happily grow in poor soil. Mass plant for effect. They will also be good in pots as it trails over the edge. The name is derived from Greek 'delos'= visible referring to the seeds that are easily seen.

Lobelia cuneifolia

An evergreen groundcover that grows to 0.2 x 0.2m. It is a fast growing groundcover when planted in a warm, semi-shade area. It is a water loving plant. The blue/purple flowers open in summer. It looks lovely when planted in a hanging baskets or containers as it will scamper off over the edge. Named for Masthias de L'Obel (1538-1616) a Flemish botanist, traveller and plant collector. He studied medicine and was physician to William, Prince of Orange. he left the Netherlands to escape the civil war and went to England to be King James's physician. He wrote describing 1500 plant species.

Plectranthus neochilus

(Lobster Flower)

An evergreen perennial, aromatic, succulent herb, which grows to 500 mm high and 600 mm wide. The deep blue and purple flowers are borne from September to April. This Plectranthus has succulent, grey-green leaves, which form an attractive ground cover even when the plant is not in flower. They are used to scare away snakes from human dwellings (perhaps because of their unpleasant aromatic smell) and other documented reports indicate that these plants can be used effectively as an air purifier. Plants perform exceptionally well as ground covers in light shade and full sun. Stems root easily and the plant spreads, forming a tidy clump. The plant is often used in the landscaping of difficult sites. It may look a little stressed in very dry conditions, but bounces back when it receives some water. It is drought resistant. The plant prefers loam to sandy soil with good drainage and has relatively low water requirements. It is an ideal plant for containers and rockeries. This is the larval host plant for Bush Bronze, Garden Inspector, Mocker Blue, Eyed Pansy, the March Commodor and the African Leaf Commodor butterflies. The name is derived from the Greek plektron = a spur; anthos= a flower. These plants have conspicuously spurred flowers. Neochilus means new lipped which refers to the shape of the flower.

Ruellia otaviensis

This is a tough, low-growing groundcover, with funnel-shaped, purple flowers opening in the warmer months. It thrives in sun or shade and forms a good groundcover in difficult areas. It is quite drought tolerant and it should be trimmed back in late winter to keep it neat. A decoction of the leaves is given for weakness and the leaves are also used for ear complaints. named for Jean Ruel ( 1474-1537) who was a French physician and priest who wrote a treatise on botany, a massive work which is 666 pages long.

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