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Bulbine natalensis

(Broad-Leaved Bulbine)

Broad-leaved Bubine looks a lot like an Aloe. It had very broad leaves and has a spread of 1m x 1m. Plant in the semi shade and deep shade and watch it thrive. It is a neat plant and would be suitable for a townhouse garden. It is medicinal and the leaves are used as a dressing for wounds and the roots are also utilized. This is a rewarding garden plant. The name comes from the Latin for an onion or a bulb which is ironical as they are not bulbs.

Cineraria saxifraga

(Wild Cineraria)

Evergreen groundcover which is water wise, fast growing and only grows to about 30 cm. They are found on rocky slopes in the Eastern Cape. It will flourish in the sun or semi-shade and is best if it has compost and mulch. The yellow flowers open in Spring-Autumn and they attract birds and butterflies. It likes a well-drained soil. This would be ideal for small gardens or even to cover beds in a large garden. It is very pretty in flower and can be used in retaining walls, pots or hanging baskets. The name is derived from the latin 'cinereus' meaning ash coloured. This refers to the ash coloured hairs that occur on the leaf surface. Saxifragra refers to the rocky habitat where it occurs.

Cyrtanthus mackenii

(Ifafa Lilly)

This deciduous groundcover is frost resistant and fast growing. It was first discovered on the banks of the Ifafa River near Port Shepstone, hence the common name.It is very versatile as it grows in the sun or semi-shade and prefers a moist environment. However don't over water when they have died down in the winter. There are various colour forms pink , white, yellow or orange flowers that occur in winter. It is traditionally used as a protective charm. It is lovely in small gardens so plant it in a spot where you will enjoy the flowers in winter. Would be lovely in a pot and the flowers are long lasting in a vase. The name is derived from Greek 'kyrtoma'=curved and 'kanthos'= flower referring to the curved, tubular flower.

Eucomis autumnalis

(Pineapple Flower)

An apt name for this deciduous groundcover, as the flower looks just like a pineapple, which are yellow/green in colour and open in summer. They attract birds and butterflies. It is a good cut flower for the vase as it’s long lasting and most unusual. It is frost resistant, water wise and fast growing in the sun, shade or semi-shade. Hangovers are cured by making a brew from the bulb. It is also used for kidney and bladder ailments. The leaves are used as a poultice for boils and skin problems and they are also used to treat a fever. Cattle are treated for gall sickness. A brew is used as an enema for a protective charm or the bulb is mixed with animal fat and this is rubbed into the body to protect one from illness and evil. The name is derived from the Greek eukomes=beautifully haired, eu=well and kome=hair of the head referring to the crown of leaves at the top of the flower.

Gloriosa superba

(Flame Lily)

It is a deciduous, striking, tuberous, climbing plant with brilliant wavy-edge yellow and red flowers that open in summer. It needs to be watered well in summer however water should be withheld once the foliage begins to turn yellow. The tubers are prone to rot under moist conditions during the winter months as it is dormant in winter. The flowers are long lasting in a short vase. Although it is a poisonous plant with the roots being the most poisonous, it is a medicinal plant. Root sap is used for tooth ache. An infusion of the root is used to treeat intestinal worms. The leaves are used to treat skin problems, sprains and bruises. The paste of the corm is fried in butter and put on gout and arthritis. The root sap is also used to treat bruises, sprains, hemorrhoids, gonorrhea, impotence, infertility, toothache, worms, snake bite, dog poisoning and its used as an aphrodisiac. Despite it being poisonous, porcupines eat the roots. The seed heads are pretty and the seed is threaded into necklaces which are worn for protection and strength. The root is used to kill dogs and a snake deterrent. It is Zimbabwe's national flower. The name is derived from the Latin gloriosus=glorious referring to the colours and shape of the flowers.

Othonna carnosa

(Othonna)

A fast spreading, evergreen succulent with cylindrical grey green leaves ,an evergreen groundcover that grows about 10cm. Lovely for a large sunny rockery or for holding soil on banks or gentle slopes. The daisy shaped flowers opens all year long and it attract lots of bees and other insects. It is the larval host plant for the Painted Lady butterfly. It is a drought resistant plant that is easily grown and requires little attention but be careful not to over water. The name is derived from the Greek othonne = linen, cloth; referring to the soft texture of the leaves.

Senecio macroglossus

(Flowering Ivy)

This is an evergreen, slender, twining but not tendril-climbing herbaceous perennial. It has smooth, thin, flexible branches bearing five-pointed, ivy-like foliage. When creeping along the ground, the branches sometimes develop roots at the nodes. The leaves are a bright glossy green and are somewhat succulent. When broken, both the leaves and stems release a fresh lemony scent. Large, conspicuous pale yellow daisy flowers are borne just about all year round, but mainly during the summer months. They remain open on cloudy or dull days, and are visited by bees, moths and wasps. The seeds are small and stick-like with a tuft of greyish-white bristles at one end and they are decorative, but are soon carried off by the breeze. It does well in sun or shade. It is not hardy to frost although established plants in a protected position should be able to survive the odd cold snap. It is very drought and heat tolerant. It is not as fast growing as its relative Senecio tamoides, the Canary Creeper but it is much neater and longer lived. It is relatively easy to control and can be pruned when necessary to keep tidy. It is relatively pest free, but aphids may sometimes be found on flower buds or on the young growing tips. It is an ideal plants for hanging baskets. The name is derived from the Latin senex=an old man. The white hairy pappus (scales or bristles) of the seed is reminiscent of an old man's beard.

Zantedeschia albomaculata

(Arrow-Leaved Arum)

This is a summer rainfall, deciduous species from eastern Southern Africa. It is found in marshy ground on rocky or grassy mountainsides or stream banks. It is a medium/tall plant with striking arrow shaped leaves that often have white spots. The name albomaculata means "spotted with white.” It has white/creamy spathes, with a dark throat. This attracts the pollinators which are either spiders or beetles. Lydenberg in Mpumalange is home to 4 Zantedescia species. The Zulu women use a decoction of the plant to treat women who have frequent miscarriages and give birth to weak babies. The flowers are suitable for the vase. Named for Giovanni Zantedeschia (1773-1846) an Italian physician, pharmacist and botanist. He was particularly interested in the flora of Northern Italy where he discovered and described many new species.

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