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Crassula spathulata

An evergreen groundcover which is frost resistant, drought resistant, fast growing in the sun, shade or semi-shade. The white flowers are seen all year. It would be good in containers or hanging baskets as it scampers over the edge of pots. It is very fast growing, covers quickly and is ideal for small gardens and retaining walls. This is the larval host plant for the Tailed Black-eye butterfly. Named from the Latin 'crassus'= and 'ula'= diminutive referring to the fleshy succulent leaves.

Cryptocarya latifolia

(Broad-Leaved Quince)

An evergreen, medium tree with a dense crown. The bark is grey-brown, smooth with fine vertical fissures. The leaves are leathery, dark green with fine hairs above and greenish brown below. The white flowers are small and borne in branched sprays and they open in spring .The spherical fruit ripens to black. It should be planted in sun or semi-shade. It is medicinal and magical and it also attracts mammals. The name is derived from the Greek 'kryptos'= hidden and 'karya'= a nut as the succulent fruit is hidden.

Cussonia transvaalensis

(Transvaal Cabbage Tree)

Small to medium-sized tree up to 5 m, with attractive, coarsely textured grey-green foliage. The bark is corky and deeply longitudinally fissured. The small, green flowers are borne in dense finger-like structures in spring-summer and they are pollinated by insects. The flowers are followed by the production of small, purple-black berries, which are relished by many species of fruit-eating birds. It requires well-drained soil and a warm garden as it is frost tender. It can tolerate more water in the garden than what it gets in the wild and makes a lovely garden subject. It attracts birds. Named for Pierre Cusson 1727-1783 who was a French Jesuit, mathematician, physician, professor and botanist who traveled extensively and wrote many publications.

Cyperus papyrus

(Papyrus)

This very fast growing evergreen shrub grows about 2m high and 1m wide. It forms clumps of tall bare stems, each topped with a mop-like head or crown of thread-like flower spikes. This is the plant that the ancient Egyptians used to make paper. The dried, split stems are woven to make traditional doors and mats. They are also used medicinally as they are bound over wounds. Plant it near water or in the water in full sun. It’s an ideal plant for containers. The leaves are an interesting addition to a flower arrangement. Cut it back if damaged by frost. The name is derived from Latin 'cuperos' and Greek 'kypeoros'= sedge or rush.

Cyperus prolifer

(Dwarf Papyrus)

This is an evergreen water-loving, attractive, medium-sized groundcover that grows to 30cm high and 15cm wide. It has very inconspicuous leaves, represented by red-brown sheaths at the base. It should be planted in full sun. It is an excellent plant for the containers and is ideal for small wetland gardens. The name is derived from Latin 'cuperos' and Greek 'kypeoros'= sedge or rush.

Diascia integerrima

(Twinspur)

This evergreen ground cover grows to 30 cm and is fast growing in the sun or semi-shade. The pink and white flowers are seen all year. It’s great for a bird garden as it attracts insect eaters as well as attracts butterflies. It is great for containers as it’s a showy ground cover. Be sure that the containers don't dry out as this plant likes water, good soil and drainage. It’s a good idea to interplant with Watsonias. It is also useful as it is used as a pot herb. The name is derived from the Greek 'di'=two and 'askion'=bladder or belly referring to two lateral corolla pouches. Integerimma refers to the entire leaf margin which is not serrated.

Dietes bicolor

(Yellow Wild Iris)

This evergreen groundcover is frost resistant, water wise and will happily grow in the sun. The yellow flowers open in spring and attract birds - insect eaters as well as butterflies. It is a clump-forming, graceful plant which prefers a well-watered position. It is ideal for small gardens. The name is derived from the Greek 'dis'=two and 'etes'=an associate referring to the flower spike that lasts 2 years. An associate as the flowers are similar to Morea and Iris families.

Dietes iridioides

This evergreen groundcover has sword-shaped, dark green leaves in a loose fan. This prolific flowerer carries its flowers on a wiry, arching stem. The flowers are white with mauve markings, dainty and new flowers open continually during spring and summer. It is drought-resistant and will thrive in semi-shade as well as full sun, often where little else will grow. It tolerates both wind and frost. There are many medicinal uses as infusions made from the rhizome are taken orally or in enemas to treat dysentery, are used during childbirth, for hypertension and as a tonic for goats. Roots are used for first menstruation. It is also an ideal plant for a wetland garden. The name is derived from the Greek 'dis'=two and 'etes'=an associate referring to the flower spike that lasts 2 years. An associate as the flowers are similar to Morea and Iris families.

Dimorphotheca ecklonis (was Osteospermum ecklonis)

(Blue-and-White Daisy Bush)

This is an evergreen groundcover, (75 x 75cm), which is frost resistant and fast growing in the sun or semi-shade. The white flowers open in Spring-Summer and attract insect eating birds and is the larval host plant for the Dickson's opal, Pan opal and the Turner's Opal butterflies. It’s useful for containers as it is striking in flower. The white flowers have mauve under the petals and a dark blue centre. Do mass plant for a stunning effect. The name is derived from the Greek di = two, morphe=form, theka=a fruit referring to the two different shaped fruit .

Dimorphotheca jucundum (was Osteospermum jucundum)

(Trailing Mauve Daisy)

This evergreen groundcover grows to 20 x 60cm and is frost resistant and fast growing in the sun or semi-shade. The pink/purple flowers open in Autumn-Spring and attract insect eating birds and is the larval host plant for the Dickson's opal, Pan opal and the Turner's Opal butterflies. butterflies. It can be planted into containers or to creeping as it covers quickly. The name is derived from the Greek di = two, morphe=form, theka=a fruit referring to the two different shaped fruit . Striking in flower and also looks pretty cascading over rocks.

Diospyros simii

(Climbing Star-Apple)

An evergreen small sized tree. It is a drought resistant, fast growing and it grows well when planted in the sun or semi shade. It produces white flowers in Spring which are visited by butterflies and these are followed by edible fruits which are orange. They are about 3 cm in diameter and are attractive as well as attracting fruit eating birds.This is also a great little tree for a butterfly garden as it is the larval host for butterflies.

Dovyalis caffra

(Kei Apple)

This small 5m evergreen tree is frost resistant, water wise, fast growing in the sun or semi-shade. The cream flowers are rich in nectar, which attracts butterflies, and are produced in spring and are followed by apricot fruit which attract birds - insect and fruit eaters like the Louries and black eyed Blackeyed Bulbuls. It should produce fruit when about 3 years old.It makes a safe nesting site. It is useful for an informal hedge/screen or a thorny security barrier as they retain their lower branches and can be planted close together as they do not have aggressive roots. The fruit is also useful as it is rich in vitamin C and although sour it is tasty and is eaten raw or used for jelly and jam making. It is eaten by Monkeys and Baboon. The trees are also browsed by game. The Kei Apple will do well in a container and is popular for bonsai. The branches are also used in flower arrangements.The oval leaves are shiny, dark green with a smooth margin. It is successful if planted in a coastal garden or in a Highveld garden. This tree was first grown in Europe in 1870 but is now grown worldwide, in California, the Mediterranean and Australia. Plant it 2 meters from buildings and pools. The name is derived from the Greek dovyalis = spear refering to the long thorns.

Dracaena aletriformis

(Large-Leaved Dragon Tree, Grootblaardrakeboom)

This small evergreen tree will thrive in shade. It produces masses of orangy/yellow/white flowers in spring which are sweetly scented at night and attract nocturnal insects like the Hawk Moth which is the pollinator. They are followed by orange fruit which attract birds - insect eaters and fruit eaters like pigeons, louries and black-eyed bulbuls. It also attracts butterflies which feed on the leaves The Bush Nightfighter butterfly larvae wraps a part of the leaf over itself and comes out at night to feed on the leaves. Field mice and birds, like the Natal Robin nest in the leaves. It is a stunning, dramatic foliage plant which can be grown indoors if there is enough air flow or in a pot on a shady patio as it has non aggressive roots. It is frost tender so choose a protected spot close to the house where the building will provide protection. The name is derived from the Greek drakaina=a female dragon.

Dymondia margaretae

(Silver Carpet)

This an flat growing, evergreen, creeping groundcover. It is fast-growing, forming a dense, spreading, flat mat of growth, which completely covers the surface.Short, rigid, blue-grey leaves are borne on short erect shoots.Small, solitary, stalkless, daisy-like yellow flowers appear year-round, peaking in spring and early summer. It is a one-of-a-kind, hardy, carpet-forming groundcover with a compact, neat habit and stunning blue-grey foliage. It is perfect for those tight spots between stepping stones and sunny courtyards. It is visited by bees, butterflies and other insects. Named for Margaret E Dryden-Dymond (1909-1952) who was on the horticultural staff at Kirstenbosch. She found the Dymondia in Bredasdorp in 1933.

Dyschoriste rogersii

(Blue Joy)

This little evergreen grows to 50 cm high and 50 cm wide. It is fast growing and bears blue flowers in spring-autumn. It should be planted in sun in an informal border. It is also a great plant for a butterfly garden as it is the larval host plant for the Marbled Elf, Small Marbled Elf and the Gaika Blue butterflies. The name is derived from the Greek dys=poorly and khoristos= separated. The stigma is only weakly bilobed.

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