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Aloe aculeata

(Prickly Aloe)

A low growing Aloe with a very tall, yellow flower spike, which attracts the sunbirds. The leaves have spines on both the upper and under surfaces and the name aculeate means spines. It occurs naturally in Limpopo and Mpumalanga, so protect from the cold if you have a frosty garden. This is the aloe that was depicted on our 10 c coin. The word Aloe comes from the Greek and refers to the bitter leaf gel.

Aloe affinis

(Common or Graskop Aloe)

This Aloe is stemless or has a short stem, and more or less spotted yellowish green leaves with brownish or whitish lines on the upper surface parallel to the axis of the leaf and yellow to light brown teeth on the margins. Each rosette can produce several branched inflorescences, and each inflorescence can have up to ten racemes with flowers that range in colour from dark red to pink. Its flowering time is in winter. It is drought and frost resistant but requires sun. It attracts birds and butterflies. The word Aloe comes from the Greek and refers to the bitter leaf gel.

Aloe cryptopoda (wikensii)

(Coral Aloe)

This is an evergreen groundcover, 1m x 1m which is happy in full sun. The red and yellow flowers occur in winter and they attract birds and butterflies. It is a popular garden plant and is useful for containers. The word Aloe comes from the Greek and refers to the bitter leaf gel.

Aloe greatheadii was A.davyana

(Aloe Davyana)

This Aloe is stemless or has a short stem, and more or less spotted yellowish green leaves with brownish or whitish lines on the upper surface parallel to the axis of the leaf and yellow to light brown teeth on the margins. Each rosette can produce several branched inflorescences, and each inflorescence can have up to ten racemes with flowers that range in colour from dark red to pink. Its flowering time is in winter. This is the Aloe that ones sees in the Highveld grasslands in winter. It is drought and frost resistant but requires sun. It attracts nectar eating birds and butterflies. It is medicinal as the leaf sap is used for blisters, bits, stings, burns, sore and wounds. It is successfully used for snake bite and sunburn. The flowers last well in the vase. The word Aloe comes from the Greek and refers to the bitter leaf gel.

Aloe mudenensis

(Mudens Aloe)

This evergreen stemless aloe is water wise and fast growing if planted in the sun. It has yellow-red or pink flowers in winter which attract birds, both insect eaters and nectar feeders. It occurs in Northern Natal, so would need protection from frost on the Highveld. It would be ideal for small gardens. The word Aloe comes from the Greek and refers to the bitter leaf gel.

Aloe striata

(Coral Aloe)

This aloe grows to 1m x 1m and is water wise and fast growing in a sunny spot. The flowers are very variable, usually being deep coral, but also pink, orange or yellow. It flowers in winter and spring and attracts birds, both the insect and nectar eaters. It is lovely in a pot or a planter box. The leaves are a blueish colour and have a distinctive coral coloured stripe down the edges of the leaves. It is ideal for small gardens or mass planting in a large garden. The word Aloe comes from the Greek and refers to the bitter leaf gel.

Arctotheca calendula

(Cape Dandylion)

A sprawling perennial which grows to 25cm tall. The daisy-type flowers are about 6cm across and are a striking yellow. They are mostly pollinated by butterflies. It flowers all year long and is one of the hardy groundcovers that can be used as a substitute for lawn and it also prevents soil erosion. It is able to grow in any garden soil, although it is advisable to add plenty of compost. The Cape Dandelion grows best in full sun and requires a moderate amount of water. It is hardy to moderate frost. The name comes from the Latin kalendae=calendar and ula = little referring to the fact that it flowers all year.

Bulbine frutescens

(Stalked Bulbine)

These occur naturally in the Cape, the Free State and KwaZulu Natal. This hardy, evergreen groundcover is dependable as it is frost resistant, water wise and fast growing in the sun. There are both orange or yellow flowering forms and they flower all year. Plant with white Osteospermum for a lovely show. The flowers attract birds and butterflies. It is a medicinal plant as the leaf gel has excellent healing, antiseptic properties and is used for relieving stings, burns, rashes, liver spots, blisters, itchy spots, fever blisters, cracked lips, cold sores, cracked finger nails, mouth ulcers, and cold sores. An infusion of a few leaves in a cup of boiling water , is left to stand and then strained and drunk for coughs, colds and arthritis. It is used magically as an emetic if the patient is going mad after being bewitched. The leaves are eaten as a relish. It will be ideal for small gardens and the flowers are long lasting in a vase. The name comes from the Latin for an onion or a bulb which is ironical as they are not bulbs. Frutescens means 'growing in a shrubby fashion'. Propagate from seed or division.

Carissa Green carpet

(Small Num-Num)

Carissa green carpet Small Num-Num is an evergreen ground cover suitable for semi-shade and only grows to 30cm tall. It has fragrant white flowers all year and it attracts birds. It would be useful for a thorny barrier and would also be good for containers. It is a favourite of landscapers as it is used for mass planting.

Chlorophytum comosum vittatum

(Variegated Hen And Chickens)

The variegated, grass-like, leaves brighten up a shady area. These plants will survive some drought, but only really look attractive if watered regularly. They have fleshy, tuberous roots about 5 to 10 cm long. When in flower, the plant produces long, thin stems which carry white flowers, as well as plantlets at the tip of the flower stem. It flowers all year round. A single plant with a few of these stems will soon become a mother plant surrounded by a flock of "babies" - hence the name 'hen and chickens'. Frost will kill the leaves, but mild frost will not damage the roots. The leaves are eaten as spinach.It's an ideal plant for containers and hanging baskets. It is also used in Auruvedic medicine and is magical as the plant is placed in the room of an expectant mother as protection and the roots are soaked in water which is then taken daily to ensure the birth of a healthy child. This water is also given to the new born child as a purgative. The name is derived from the Greek 'chloros' meaning yellow green and 'phyton' meaning plant, referring to the green leaves and greenish flowers. Comosum means tufted.

Crassula expansa

(Fragile Crassula)

This is a sturdy, branched, compact, rounded, evergreen succulent shrub growing from 1 - 3 m tall. It has glossy, dark to grey-green oval leaves on short, stubby branches and a robust stem or trunk. The leaves are often edged with red, more so if the plant is in full sun. The flowers are pink and the flowering time varies according to the climate. The stems soon become gnarled and stout, suggesting great age. It is grown all over the world, most often as a pot plant. It is magical and believed to bring financial good luck. The khoi eat the roots. It attracts butterflies. Some of our landscapers call it 'sprinkle spread' as it's ideal in areas where nothing else will grow. Give your plant a 'haircut' and sprinkle the bits. it will rapidly spread and thrive! This is the larval host plant for the Tailed Black-eye butterfly. Named from the Latin 'crassus'= and 'ula'= diminutive referring to the fleshy succulent leaves.

Crassula spathulata

An evergreen groundcover which is frost resistant, drought resistant, fast growing in the sun, shade or semi-shade. The white flowers are seen all year. It would be good in containers or hanging baskets as it scampers over the edge of pots. It is very fast growing, covers quickly and is ideal for small gardens and retaining walls. This is the larval host plant for the Tailed Black-eye butterfly. Named from the Latin 'crassus'= and 'ula'= diminutive referring to the fleshy succulent leaves.

Crassula swaziensis

Low growing succulent which is very pretty as the leaves are arranged in rosettes. It is low growing and produces pinky white flowers in autumn and winter. It would be great in dry places in a town house gardens or in pots. It would look lovely mass planted in a large garden. Drought resistant. This is the larval host plant for the Tailed Black-eye butterfly. Named from the Latin 'crassus'= and 'ula'= diminutive referring to the fleshy succulent leaves.

Cyperus prolifer

(Dwarf Papyrus)

This is an evergreen water-loving, attractive, medium-sized groundcover that grows to 30cm high and 15cm wide. It has very inconspicuous leaves, represented by red-brown sheaths at the base. It should be planted in full sun. It is an excellent plant for the containers and is ideal for small wetland gardens. The name is derived from Latin 'cuperos' and Greek 'kypeoros'= sedge or rush.

Diascia integerrima

(Twinspur)

This evergreen ground cover grows to 30 cm and is fast growing in the sun or semi-shade. The pink and white flowers are seen all year. It’s great for a bird garden as it attracts insect eaters as well as attracts butterflies. It is great for containers as it’s a showy ground cover. Be sure that the containers don't dry out as this plant likes water, good soil and drainage. It’s a good idea to interplant with Watsonias. It is also useful as it is used as a pot herb. The name is derived from the Greek 'di'=two and 'askion'=bladder or belly referring to two lateral corolla pouches. Integerimma refers to the entire leaf margin which is not serrated.

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