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Salvia chamelaeagnea

(Blue Salvia)

This is an evergreen shrub that is easy to grow, flowering in a range of colours through summer. With its upright growth and fresh green foliage it also provides texture and contrast. For best results, these plants require full sun, well-drained, good garden soil and regular water, especially in winter. Flowering bright blue during the long hot summers, these plants grow easily even in the dry landscapes, riverbeds and in sandy soil among rocks. It also attracts birds and it is the larval host plant to the Mocker Blue, Sabi Smoky Blue, Graham's Blue. Ketsi Blue and Variable Blue butterflies. A tea is brewed from the leaves and this is used to treat colds, coughs, diarrhea, flatulence, heartburn and female ailments.

Scabiosa africana

(Pincushion)

This is a fast-growing groundcover that has finely divided grey-green foliage. It covers 30 x 30cm in full sun and semi-shade. It produces a pretty mauve flower in spring and autumn on long stalks about 40cm tall. Plant these in a mixed border and use the flowers for the vase. The flowers attract butterflies and birds. The name is from the Latin scabios=rough, scaly and from the Latin scapies-roughness, scurf, itch, referring to leprosy; alluding to the plant's supposed ability to cure cutaneous diseases and as remedies for relief from 'the itch'.

Scadoxus multiflorus subsp. katharinae

(Katherine Wheel)

This is one of our most beautiful bulbs. The word ‘mutiflorus’ refers to the large flower which is 25 cm in diameter and is made up of numerous smaller flowers to form a ball. They are pinklish, orangy red and last for about 2 weeks. The seed is red when ripe so just as attractive. It likes moist shade and occurs from the Eastern Cape all the way up into Central Africa. I shall never forget the first time I saw it in flower at Ngorogoro Crater in Tanzania. It literally stops you in your tracks. Although it is poisonous it is also used medicinally and to make love charms. Named from the Greek scias= that which you know and the Greek doxus = glorious splendid referring to the magnificent, bright orange red flowers. A glorious umbrel.

Scadoxus puniceus

(Paintbrush)

This deciduous bulb is rare and worth trying to track down. It has huge crimson flowers that open in spring and last for about 4 months during summer. The bright red seeds then fill the space and are quite eye-catching. As it is deciduous one doesn't have to worry about it during a frosty winter. It prefers a very shady garden and even does well indoors. Although the bulb is poisonous it is used in traditional medicine. The roots are used to treat a couch, headaches and pregnancy. Named from the Greek scias= that which you know and the Greek doxus = glorious splendid referring to the magnificent, bright crimson flowers. A glorious umbrel.

Schotia brachypetala

(Weeping Boerbean)

This large, handsome, evergreen tree is drought resistant and relatively frost resistant in warm areas. It is found in riverine forests so is adaptable as it grows in the sun, shade or semi-shade. It occurs naturally in Botswana, Zimbabwe, Transvaal and Natal. The stunning rich, deep red flowers open in spring and summer and they attract birds, the insect, fruit and nectar eaters. They are also eaten by louries, parrots, baboons and monkeys. It flowers best after a long dry winter so don't be tempted to water it in the winter. The leaves are browsed by baboon, giraffe, impala, nyala and black rhino. It is also used for nesting sites and attracts Foxy and Giant charaxes butterflies. The bark is traditionally used to make sangoma's red dye and the seeds are roasted and eaten. The seeds were eaten by the early Boers. It’s a magical tree and is used to ward off evil. There are many medicinal uses as a decoction is drunk after excessive beer drinking and for heartburn, nausea and diarrhoea. The smoke from the leaves is inhaled for nose bleeds. Powdered leaves are put on ulcers to speed up healing. The bark contains tannin and is used for tanning leather. The wood is hard and is used for furniture, flooring and fuel. It’s a show stopper when in flower but do remember that it drops nectar on parked cars, hence the common name! The roots are not aggressive so plant it about 3 meters from a building and a pool. This is a popular bonsai subject. The Tsonga common name of "Mvhovhovhoz" imitates the sound of the swarming insects at flowering. Named for Richard van der Schot ( 1730-1790) a Dutch gardener who studied at Leiden and became head gardener at the imperial Gardens at Schonbrunn. He was then asked to take a 4 year journery to Grenada, Saint Vincent, Aruba, Cuba and Curacao to collect tropical plants and 'curiosities' for the palaces natural history collection.

Scutia myrtina

(Cat-Thorn)

This small evergreen tree/shrub/creeper is frost resistant, water wise and fast growing in the sun, semi-shade or deep shade. The yellow flowers occur in summer, and then become fruit which attracts fruit eating birds. It is also used for nesting sites. It is the larval host plant for the Forest-king Emperor and the Rufous - winged Elfin butterflies. it's most important use is as a security barrier. The Cat Thorn has hooked thorns which make it an effective barrier. The leaves are used medicinally and it is browsed by game. The name is derived from the Latin scutum=a shield. this refers to the calyx that surrounds the fruit like a shield.

Searsia chirindensis (Rhus chirindensis)

(Red Currant)

The red currant is a semi-deciduous shrub to small tree, 6-10 m tall although it may reach 20 m. Young and coppicing branches are armed with spines, although the mature tree is spineless. The flowers are small, yellowish green and are borne in clusters at the ends of the branches from August to March. Male and female flowers occur on separate trees. The edible fruit, which is round, shiny, slightly fleshy, dark reddish brown are borne from December to March, in heavy clusters which can weigh down the branches. They are also enjoyed by people and fruit eating birds like pigeons, louries, bulbuls, barbets and parrots as well as monkeys. The leaves and the bark are browsed by Black Rhino, kudu, duiker, bushbuck and nyala. It can be grown in full sun or partial shade and should be planted in well-drained, composted soil. It does not have an aggressive root system. It will tolerate moderate frosts and is drought hardy. The sap of this tree is used in traditional medicine for treating heart complaints. The bark is also used to strengthen the body, to stimulate circulation and in the treatment of rheumatism and mental disorders. It is the larval host for the Macken's Dart, Burnished Opal, Mooi River Opal, Namaqua Arrowhead and the Pringle's Arrowhead butterflies. The wood is red and is used to make furniture. We have had Mopani worms on the tree in our nursery which delighted my staff as they eat them. A lovey shade tree. Plant it 4 meters from a building or a pool. The name is derived from the Greek rhous, = red; referring to the fruits or the autumn leaves. Named for Paul Sears( 1891-1990) a US plant ecologist and professor who authored many books.

Selago corymbosa

(Bitterblombos)

A perennial shrub grows to 60cm tall. The leaves are light green, narrowly linear with their edges rolled under. The leaves are clustered in the stem axils. The flowers are small and white on short spikes. The flowering time is December to June. It is a fast growing and it thrives in sun or semi-shade. Plant in mixed border and cut it back after flowering to keep looking neat. It is the larval host plant to the Ketsi Blue, Victors Blue and Variable Blue butterflies. The name is derived from the Latin sel=sight and Jach=beneficial which refers to the medicinal properties especially for eye diseases.

Senecio barbetonicus

(Succulent Bush Senecio)

This neat, compact, rounded shrub has long narrow, needle-like succulent leaves that almost resemble skinny jelly beans. It grows to 1.5m high and 1.5 wide. The small sweetly scented yellow daisy flowers are displayed in spring. It grows in sun and semi-shade. It is a drought resistant and frost hardy plant. This shrub when planted in the garden requires moderate watering in summer and very little in winter. Trim it once in a while to keep it neat. It attracts butterflies and is browsed by game. The name is derived from the Latin senex=an old man. The white hairy pappus (scales or bristles) of the seed is reminiscent of an old man's beard.

Senecio macroglossus

(Flowering Ivy)

This is an evergreen, slender, twining but not tendril-climbing herbaceous perennial. It has smooth, thin, flexible branches bearing five-pointed, ivy-like foliage. When creeping along the ground, the branches sometimes develop roots at the nodes. The leaves are a bright glossy green and are somewhat succulent. When broken, both the leaves and stems release a fresh lemony scent. Large, conspicuous pale yellow daisy flowers are borne just about all year round, but mainly during the summer months. They remain open on cloudy or dull days, and are visited by bees, moths and wasps. The seeds are small and stick-like with a tuft of greyish-white bristles at one end and they are decorative, but are soon carried off by the breeze. It does well in sun or shade. It is not hardy to frost although established plants in a protected position should be able to survive the odd cold snap. It is very drought and heat tolerant. It is not as fast growing as its relative Senecio tamoides, the Canary Creeper but it is much neater and longer lived. It is relatively easy to control and can be pruned when necessary to keep tidy. It is relatively pest free, but aphids may sometimes be found on flower buds or on the young growing tips. It is an ideal plants for hanging baskets. The name is derived from the Latin senex=an old man. The white hairy pappus (scales or bristles) of the seed is reminiscent of an old man's beard.

Senecio tamoides

(Canary Creeper)

A vigorous fast-growing climber which has semi-succulent stems and leaves. It has a spread of 4 x 2 m. It is mostly evergreen, but during severe winters or in areas that suffer from frost, it will react deciduously, dying back and then recovering beautifully again in the spring. The light green, shiny, fleshy leaves resemble those of ivy in that they are roughly triangle-shaped with unequal lobes and are attractive all year round. The wonderfully bright canary yellow daisy flowers are borne massed in clusters during late summer and autumn .making a lovely show; they also have a delightful aromatic scent. The seeds are typical of the daisy family-fluffy and creamy white. The canary creeper is a frost tolerant, fast-growing garden plant that grows easiest in full sun, in well-drained composted garden soil against a wall or fence. Feed regularly to encourage good health. Water sparingly as this plant is semi-succulent and can tolerate long periods of dryness once it is established. It prefers a warm climate, and dies back in colder climates but will recover quickly and easily; prune away any frost damaged parts. There is nothing more stunning than a sheer drop of masses of golden yellow flowers and this creeper literally drips with flowers when in full bloom. In traditional medicine it is used to treat anthrax in cattle and flatulence. The flowers attract butterflies and the larvae of the Tricoloured Tiger and Delegorgue's Prince Moth feed on Senecio species. The name is derived from the Latin senex=an old man. The white hairy pappus (scales or bristles) of the seed is reminiscent of an old man's beard.

Senegalia galpinii (Acacia galpinii)

(Monkey Thorn)

This deciduous tree loses its leaves during the winter and is drought and frost resistant. It has a large rounded crown and is fast-growing as it can reach 25-30 m. The flower buds are purple-red and the creamy white, spike flowers open during September-October. They smell of honey! Reddish to purplish brown pods ripen during February-March. It survives hot and dry conditions and is a stunning tree as a street tree provided there is sufficient space. It is an ideal tree for a big garden. It is grazed and used for shade by giraffe, kudu and elephant. Many birds nest in this tree as it provides protection. We have a pair of grey Hornbill that nest in one on our property. It provides dappled shade on hot summer days, making it an ideal tree for planting on a lawn where some sun can penetrate. Many insects such as bees and wasps visit the flowers so it also attracts insect eating birds. The bark is used for rope and the wood is used for furniture. Mature trunks are rough and the bark often flakes away in rectangular patched. This tree has aggressive roots so don't plant it closer than 8 meters from a building or a pool. Named for Ernest Edward Galpin (1858-1941)a South African botanist and banker. He left 16,000 sheets to the Natural Herbarium and several species are named after him. .

Setaria megaphylla

(Broad-Leaved Bristle Grass)

This evergreen groundcover grows about 1m tall in the wetlands, sun or semi shade. It is frost resistant, fast growing, and bears white flowers in summer. It makes a very attractive back drop to a wetland garden as the leaves are a pretty green and interestingly 'pleated.' Birds strip the leaves for nest building and the seed eaters enjoy the fruits. The leaves are palatable and are browsed by game. It is the larval host plant to the Long-horned Skipper, Lesser-horned Skipper, Twilight Brown and Gold-spotted Skipper butterflies. Strangely, it is also eaten by dogs. It is used traditionally to treat bruises. The name is derived from the Latin seta=a bristle and aria = pertaining to: referring to the bristly awns in the involucrum. A leaf-like structure occuring just below the flower.

Stachys aethiopica

(Wild Sage)

This is an evergreen groundcover. It has opposite, ovate, toothed leaves with glandular hairs. Whorls of mauve, white or pink flowers are produced in August and September and some suggest all year round except in midwinter. The scent exuded by this plant is similar to cat urine. The plant straggles in Fynbos, grassland, scrub or forest to a height of 50 cm along the southern and eastern coasts of South Africa and into tropical Africa. It is used for the treatment of internal hemorrhoids, influenza, gynecological problems and liver disorders. It also attract birds, bees and butterflies. The name is derived from the Greek for spike, originally an ear of wheat, and it refers to the flower spike.

Strelitzia nicolai

(Natal Wild Banana)

This evergreen tree is medium sized and gives Kwazulu Natal it’s tropical feel as it grows profusely in the dune forests. It is a rapid grower and is happy in sun or semi-shade. The stunning purple/blue and cream flowers open in Spring/Summer and attract birds, the insect and nectar eaters, like the sunbirds. The flowers are eaten by monkeys. Tree frogs hibernate in the leaves and Banana bats roost in the leaves.It also attracts butterflies. It can be planted as a specimen plant or used for informal hedging/screening. It has very aggressive roots so don’t plant it near swimming pools or walls. We have one planted in a pot in the nursery to show the damage that the roots cause. It is used to make rope and the seeds are ground into flour and made into patties which are roasted. The seeds are also eaten by monkeys, Red-eyed doves, Redbilled Woodhoopoes, bulbuls, barbets and starlings. It is the larval host plant for the Banana-tree Nightfighter butterfly. Named for Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz (1744-1818) who married King George 111 of England in 1761 after being selected unseen from a list of German princesses. The marriage was a great success and King George was devoted to her. She cared for him during his long slide into insanity though terrified by his occasional outbursts of violence. She was an amateur botanist who helped expand Kew Gardens. She died in 1818 and was buried in St George's Chapel in Windsor

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