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Clematis bractiata

(Traveller's Joy)

This deciduous, twining climber or scrambler with woody stems can reach 5 meters. It produces lovely white flowers in summer and grows in most soils. It makes a trouble free and eye-catching sight. The untidy end-of-season growth needs to be cut back at the end of winter. It likes summer water and a dry winter. The leaves are traditionally used to relieve headaches, coughs and colds, chest ailments, abdominal upsets and as a soothing wash for aching feet, cracked skin, blisters and tired eyes. The inhaled scent of crushed tendrils and stems is said to clear a blocked nose, ease sinus headaches and encourage sneezing. The inhaled steam from the roots, stems and leaves in boiling water is used for relieving colds, malaria, sinus infections and asthma and a strong brew of leaves, stems and flowers in the bath relieves aching muscles, VD and thrush. Leaves are placed in the boots of hikers to relieve tired feet and blisters. They are also packed under the saddles of horses to prevent saddle sores. Leaves are also placed under a sun at to keep the head cool and to prevent heatstroke and sunstroke. It is also used as a good luck charm. The name is derived from the Greek 'klematis' meaning a vine branch, twig or tendril of a climbing plant.

Coleonema album

(White Confetti Bush)

The name is derived from the Greek 'koleus' = a sheath and 'nema'= thread referring to the filaments of the stamens.This decorative, evergreen shrub with dainty, sweetly scented, white flowers in spring make this buchu an ideal garden plant and suitable for floral arrangements. It grows to 1m high and 0.75m wide. This species requires full sun and soil that is acid, well drained and composted. Add a layer of mulch to keep the soil and roots cool in summer, retain moisture and reduce weeds. They require good watering in winter and moderate watering in summer. Do not allow plants to dry out. It is an ideal container plant for a sunny position on a patio and can also be hedged. It attracts birds. The aromatic leaves contain essential oils and are used by fishermen to remove the fishy smell from their hands. They can also be used as an insect repellent by rubbing the leaves onto the skin or boiled in water and spayed on plants or even clothes. For an invigorating bath, add leaves to the bathwater. It is used medicinally for colds, abdominal pains and flu. The leaves can be chewed for a sore throat and a tea can be made by steeping some leaves in a cup of boiling water. The leaves are used to make cosmetics, deodorant and perfume. A wealth of uses just from the leaves.

Coleonema pulchellum

(Dark Pink Confetti Bush)

The name is derived from the Greek 'koleus' = a sheath and 'nema'= thread referring to the filaments of the stamens.This is an evergreen, upright, reasonably dense shrub which grows to 1,5m high and 1,5m wide which produces pink flowers in winter and spring. The foliage is fine with needle-shaped leaves which have an aromatic fragrance when crushed. Fishermen use this plant to get rid of the fishy smell on their hands as well a their nets. Make a 'tea' out of the leaves and then put into a bath and it will make your skin tingle and leave you refreshed. They are also insect repellent and if the 'tea' is rubbed into ones skin it will repel mosquitoes. Campers also rub the leaves on their pillows and bedding.They fit in well with members of the Protea family and other fynbos. If you have sufficient space, plant in groups of 3 or 5.The confetti bush will get woody after a few years and should then be replaced. Do not allow young plants to dry out but once established they will survive periods of drought. They respond to good watering in winter and moderate watering in summer. It looks amazing when is used as a hedge or for screening .It is suitable for coastal gardens. They are also used medicinally as a tea is made from the leaves, and Artemesia afra can also be added to cure coughs and cold. It is said to help a sore throat if the leaves are chewed. The fragrant leaves are also added to Pot Pourri.

Cotyledon orbiculata

(Pigs Ears)

Pig’s Ear. Named from the Greek 'kotyledon'=seed sheath and 'kotyl'= cup referring to the bowl or spoon shaped seed leaves. This fast growing succulent has thick leaves that are greyish green. The tall flower spikes produce bunches of pink tubular flowers in winter. These attract bees and nectar feeding birds like the sunbirds. The leaves are used medicinally for corns, boils and warts and the leaf juice is used to treat earache, toothache and epilepsy. Syphilis is treated with an enema made from the leaves. They are also dried and used as a protective charm for an orphan child. Carl Pappe, a physician came to the Cape in 1831 and he studied the medicinal benefits for epilepsy. He wrote Indigenous Plants Used as remedies by the Colonists of The Cape of Good Hope in 1847. These plants have escaped from gardens in Australia, New Zealand and California and become an invasive weed, probably because they require very little water. It is the larval host for two moth species as well as Pale Hairtail, Burnished Opal, Natal Opal, Common Black-eye, Henning's Black-eye and the Cape Black-eye.

Crassula ovata

(Pink Joy, Money Plant, Penny Plant, Dollar Plant, Tree of Happiness)

This is a sturdy, branched, compact, rounded, evergreen succulent tree is thought of as a shrub growing from 1 - 3 m tall. It has glossy, dark to grey-green oval leaves on short, stubby branches and a robust stem or trunk. The leaves are often edged with red, more so if the plant is in full sun. The flowers are pink and the flowering time varies according to the climate. It is drought resistant. The stems soon become gnarled and stout, suggesting great age. It is grown all over the world, most often as a pot plant. The Khoi eat the roots. It attracts bees, wasps, flies and beetles. This is the larval host plant for the Tailed Black-eye butterfly. Slice a leaf in half and strap it to a wart and leave on overnight.It is magical and in the USA, Germany and the East it is planted into square, porcelain tubs to bring financial luck which gives rise to it's many common names. Named from the Latin 'crassus'= and 'ula'= diminutive referring to the fleshy succulent leaves.

Cyperus alternifolius

(Sedge)

An evergreen shrub that grows to a height of 1m. The bracts are symmetrically arranged in an umbrella formation and held atop elegant stems that sway with the breeze, giving a tropical feel to the garden. It is a versatile plant ,easily grown and makes an excellent ornamental waterside or marginal plant for water gardens. As an indoor pot plant they are useful for a conservatory, or as interior plant for commercial offices, hotels and malls. Ideally in containers should be stood in water. Its fascinating shape makes it a great plant for landscaping, and as an accent plant or an informal screen. As a background plant, it combines well with other foliage plants or flowering plants in garden beds or borders. It is impossible to over water the ‘Umbrella Plant’ as it enjoys damp and boggy conditions. It can be grown in shallow water of small fish ponds as a water filtration marginal plant. It is excellent for a tropical water garden, a bog garden or wetland. The tall bracts are also excellent when used in fresh or dried floral arrangements. It is similar to Cyprus textiles and it is used to make baskets, twine and mats. The name is derived from Latin 'cuperos' and Greek 'kypeoros'= sedge or rush.

Cyperus papyrus

(Papyrus)

This very fast growing evergreen shrub grows about 2m high and 1m wide. It forms clumps of tall bare stems, each topped with a mop-like head or crown of thread-like flower spikes. This is the plant that the ancient Egyptians used to make paper. The dried, split stems are woven to make traditional doors and mats. They are also used medicinally as they are bound over wounds. Plant it near water or in the water in full sun. It’s an ideal plant for containers. The leaves are an interesting addition to a flower arrangement. Cut it back if damaged by frost. It is put into boats to protect them from crocodiles. The name is derived from Latin 'cuperos' and Greek 'kypeoros'= sedge or rush.

Cyphostemma lanigerum

(Wildedruif)

This deciduous shrub/scrambler grows to 2m tall. As it is deciduous it is frost resistant. It is also drought resistant and grows in the semi-shade. The yellow flowers open in Spring and the bright orange berries attract birds. It occurs naturally on the Highveld and is a worthwhile addition to a bird garden. It is medicinal as the roots are rubbed on the gum to aid toothache. The name is derived from Greek 'kyphos' = bent referring to the angle of the leaves.

Dyschoriste rogersii

(Blue Joy)

This little evergreen grows to 50 cm high and 50 cm wide. It is fast growing and bears blue flowers in spring-autumn. It should be planted in sun in an informal border. It is also a great plant for a butterfly garden as it is the larval host plant for the Marbled Elf, Small Marbled Elf and the Gaika Blue butterflies. The name is derived from the Greek dys=poorly and khoristos= separated. The stigma is only weakly bilobed.

Dyschoriste sp nova

This evergreen shrub that grows to 30cm high and is frost resistant. Plant it in the sun or semi-shade. It produces pale pinky white flowers almost all year. An ideal plant for containers. Beautiful in flower and if mass planted. I've seen is used as a low hedge around a garden bed.It is the larval host plant for the Marbled Elf, Small Marbled Elf and the Gaika Blue butterflies. The name is derived from the Greek dys=poorly and khoristos= separated. The stigma is only weakly bilobed.

Dyschoriste thunbergiiflora

(Purple Bells)

Purple Bells is an evergreen shrub which is fast growing in the sun or semi-shade. It grows to about 1.7m tall and has a spread of 1.5 meters. The beautiful violet flowers occur in summer and whenever I see them I wish that I could paint them accurately. The flowers are trumpet shaped and have purple blotches in the throat. They attract butterflies and it is the larval host plant for the Marbled Elf, Small Marbled Elf and the Gaika Blue butterflies. It would be pretty in a container or planted next to a water feature or pond. They are drought tolerant. We have used it successfully as a screen, a very beautiful one when it is in flower. Keep cutting the top few leaves and this will force the plant to send out new branches. I've seen it hedged and it responds well to pruning. It looks lovely at the back of a mixed bed and is pretty planted in the shade along with the Pistol Bush Duvernoia adhatodoides and the Forest Bell Bush Mackaya bella which has now been renamed Asystasia bella. The name is derived from the Greek dys=poorly and khoristos= separated. The stigma is only weakly bilobed.

Encephalartos ferox

(Tongaland Cycad)

This evergreen shrub grows to 1.5m x 1.5m and is frost resistant. It is happy in the shade or semi-shade and needs plenty of water.

Encephalartos villosus

(Ground Cycad)

This species responds well to cultivation provided it is grown in light shade and with sufficient moisture in frost free areas. It is an evergreen shrub of 2.5m, which is also good for containers. It has medicinal value to promote longevity and is magical as it is considered a lightning conductor and a protective charm.

Eriocephalus africanus

(Wild Rosemary)

An evergreen shrub that grows about 1m high x 1m wide.The fine, grey, aromatic foliage, the snow white flowers and the fluffy cotton wool seeds ensure that it has year long appeal. It is used for perfume and it can withstand the most adverse conditions of weather, soil and habitat. The flowers open in summer. Wild rosemary can be pruned to make a neat border hedge and can be used to soften rock and succulent gardens. The fluffy, white seeds that develop after flowering cover the bush, giving rise to the Afrikaans common name Kapokbos, meaning 'snow bush'. These fragrant seeds are used to stuff pillows. It attracts birds and butterflies and can be used instead of culinary Rosemary in cooking. Useful to flavour bean , and fish dishes and also useful in stuffing for roast chicken. The leaves are used to brew a tea to treat colds, coughs, colic, oedema, stomach ache and flatulence. It is added to the bath to treat delayed menstruation, oedema and can be used as a fragrant hair rince. A excellent shrub for every garden. The name is derived from Greek erion=wool and kephale=head, referring to the wooley seed heads

Euryops pectinatus

(Golden Daisy Bush)

This is an evergreen shrub of 1m x 1m which is very fast growing and free flowering. Its needs to be planted in the sun in well drained soil with plenty of compost. It is frost resistant and drought resistant. It is useful to line pathways and driveways or as a temporary filler until slower growing shrubs have established. It’s lovely flowers attract bees and butterflies. It is a useful, low-maintenance addition to a wildlife garden. It is used medicinally as a treatment for cold and flu. The resin is also used as an ointment for burns and to draw out thorns.

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